updating cart, please wait...
Various Artists

Though The Lowbrow Reader makes itself out to be a low-quality bathroom reader it is, in reality, a one-of-a-kind zine that holds some of the wisest and oddest essays about bygone pop culture and its fringes.

In this issue: famed cartoonist Drew Friedman writes about his love for Shemp Howard of the Three Stooges. Fast Times at Ridgemont High/Clueless director Amy Heckerling digs up a private diary...[ continued ]

In this issue of POPs, Jonas writes a speculative history of pajama stubbornness. Meghan Moyer writes about having a transgender family. Melinda Gonzalez writes about sharing geek culture with her daughter. Alex Nall draws a comic about being a teacher. Eddie Jenkins Hernandez writes about parenting in a world of conflict. And Rhea Tepp interviews openhearted punk legend Alice Bag...[ continued ]

In this issue of our favorite Portland photo journal: “Building New Ground." 20 photographers from around the world respond.

With work from: Katherine Akey, Tal Ben Avi, Linda Borst, Craig Buchan, Fergus Coyle, Alexa Cushing, Chris Giuliano, Illesha Khandelwal, Bryan May, Giuseppe Mileti, Svetlana Mladenovic, Azikiwe Mohammed, Paolo Morales, Naveen Naqvi, Kumi Oguro, Joaquin Palting, Rhombie Sandoval, and Jeanette Spicer...[ continued ]

Origin stories, séances, astronaut egos, and so many more short stories about (and relationships with) the moon.

Edited by Joseph Carlough at Displaced Snail Publications. With work by: Carolyn Busa, Charlene Kwon, Heather Butts, Hrishikesh Hirway, Jesse Reklaw, Joseph Carlough, Josh Berwanger, Katie Haegele, Kishi Bashi, Kristen Martin, Marguerite Dabaie, Michael Jasorka, Mike Adams, Mocha Ishibashi, Molly Rice, and Thaddeus Rutkowski...[ continued ]

In the new issue of our favorite literary zine, seven writers take us around the world—from ancient ruins to the room of a nursing home—while writing under the theme of "Away."

Featuring work from: Charles Reaves, Andria Alefhi, Colette Hannahan, Betsy Houston, Pam Daghlian, M.P. McCune, and Lauren Georgia.

44 pages, quarter-size, color covers. Cover art by Portland's very own collage artist extraordinaire, Kevin Sampsell...[ continued ]

"Rad Families: A Celebration honors the messy, the painful, the playful, the beautiful, the myriad ways we create families. This is not an anthology of experts, or how-to articles on perfect parenting; it often doesn’t even try to provide answers. Instead, the writers strive to be honest and vulnerable in sharing their stories and experiences, their failures and their regrets.

Gathering parents and writers from diverse communities, it explores the process of getting pregnant from trans birth to adoption, grapples with issues of racism and police brutality, probes raising feminists and feminist parenting...[ continued ]

A decade of punk photography from Nuts! fanzine editor Ben Trogdon. Hundreds of photos, full-color, countless bands and innumerable punk-life oddities.

To name just a few of the many musical greats included within: Grass Widow, Hysterics, Milk Music, and the late great Joey Casio.

Plus additional art and illustrations work from Sam Ryser, Mateo Cartagena, Sonya Sombreuil, Cecelia Caldiera, Lauren O’Connor, Nick Welch, Eugene Terry, and Somer Stampley...[ continued ]

Clock Tower Nine has become one of my new favorite zines. Using a variety-format approach reminiscent of classic '90s zines, Danny Noonan puts together a consistently interesting assortment. Letters, postcards, and the stories of others mix with personal narratives, odd facts, and ephemera.

This issue largely consists of a story about being a roadie for a band, an intercontinental fast friendship through postcards and drunk dials, and a barely-planned cross-country road trip...[ continued ]

Another zine classic from Portland's own Moe Bowstern. In the third issue of Xtra Tuf (the zine all about the world of commercial fishing in Alaska) Moe tries out the old ways. Instead of dealing with the drama on the boats, she joins some friends on beach and hauls nets by hand. What follows is an entertaining peek into a world most people don't get to see.

Xtra Tuf #3 is also a zine epic to top all zine epics...[ continued ]

A fun and fascinating gift for basically anyone, The Difference Between compares similar (or similar-sounding) things and provides straightforward definitions for each. Within: baking soda and baking powder, communism and socialism, krump and krunk, sympathy and empathy, turtle and tortoise, national deficit and national debt, girdle and corset, Dirty Harry and Debbie Harry, and so much more...[ continued ]