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Various Artists

In this, the 35-year anniversary issue of Cometbus, Aaron interviews cartoonists. Made for both the diehards and those generally wary of comics, the zine is a dive into New York comic culture—from those in the spotlight to those lighting the world behind the scenes.

Interviews with Gabrielle Bell, Robin Enrico, Jeffrey Lewis, Julia Wertz, Bill Kartalopoulos, Gary Panter, Adrian Tomine, Ben Katchor, Paul Levitz, Drew Friedman, Karen Green, Gabe Fowler, Kim Deitch, and Al Jaffee...[ continued ]

The second issue of the Portland poetry zine Windowcat, "an ongoing collection of words dedicated to furthering the reach of poetry and spreading the infinite variations of language-play that can exist." 

Includes work from: Hadas Moalem, Jamie Zerndt, Aubrey Gates King, Matt Schumacher, George Ayres, Miranda Hubbard, Heather Alexander, Dylan Stringer, Erik Olson, Adam Alexander, Anna O'Connor, Hanna Litwinowick, and a hot hot series of poems from Sam Lohmann of the great Peaches & Bats literary zine...[ continued ]

An expert in stirring opposing energies and forces into the same pot, Rachel Lee-Carman's zines are always unlike anything else; an experience all their own. Within: travels to both sidewalk tarot readings and Mom's Bible study group. There's Grandma's tea readings, palm readings, the roots of the word witch, sipping spells, urban herbal harvests, poems in hollowed-out eggs.

Friends contribute, writing about being Native American in a culture that wants to trivialize the customs and forget the people...[ continued ]

For the first volume of Why the Tapes Play Records' Covers Project series, nine artists interpret work from Swedish electro-folk band Wintergatan. A wide range of reinventions—from solo kalimba to chamber-pop to oddball electronic. 

[ continued ]

Syndicate Product, one of the all-time great compilation zines, returns with Unrecommended Reading. Ten contributors write about the books that disappointed, angered, or otherwise drove them nuts. Within: Hallmark-level hatred, revolutionary fails, anti-Anne of Green Gables, and the life-changing magic of being okay with your mess.

With words from: Davida Gypsy Breier (Xerography Debt), Jenna Freedman (Before I Forget), Kathy Moseley (Ear Plugs & Ticket Stubs​), Ken Bausert (The Ken Chronicles), Juleigh Howard-Hobson, Samantha M...[ continued ]

Things Men Have Told Me About My Body is a collection of anecdotes and stories from 30+ anonymous contributors who have had men make wildly inappropriate statements about their bodies. 

Red Velvet says it best in her introduction when she writes, "This is a zine about things that have been said to us: by friends, lovers, passerby, family, and strangers. Some are funny, some are rude, some are simply puzzling...[ continued ]

The issue that started it all, in stock here for the very first time. The highlight: a conversation with the legendary home recording artist Linda Smith. 

Also within: Heba Kadry (Timeless Mastering), Catherine Vericolli (513 Recording), Kate Davis (Track and Field Records), rapper Moor Mother Goddess, Women's Audio Mission, Dottie Alexander (of Montreal/James Husband), Holly Herndon, blursome, and Jennifer Baron (The Ladybug Transistor/The Garment District)...[ continued ]

This issue of our favorite photo journal organizes under the banner of the “Slow Read.” And within there are shooting ranges, Mars simulations, fruit harvests, kids in the back of a truck going nowhere. As poet Hajara Quinn writes in her foreword, "A suite of photographs has the quality of a poem with many possible permutations...stirring up the space between the subconscious and conscious worlds...[ continued ]

Combining her long-running Keep Writing postcard project, a community art grant, and a zine series about the idea of home, Hope Amico asked people in the summer heat of New Orleans to write about how they define home. 

Where You From #6 delves into the ins-and-outs of this immersive project—letter-pressing five-thousand postcards, going to multiple events a day, and simply trying to make the project make sense...[ continued ]

In an attempt to figure out the last record he would ever sell, Danny Noonan writes the story of a skittish teenager’s discovery of punk that leads him to house shows and eventually a move across the country. It’s a celebration of record stores that spans 25 years and explores the anxiety of youth, the community of punk, and how much it sucks not to be able to find a job when you need it the most...[ continued ]