updating cart, please wait...
Books

A fun and fascinating gift for basically anyone, The Difference Between compares similar (or similar-sounding) things and provides straightforward definitions for each. Within: baking soda and baking powder, communism and socialism, krump and krunk, sympathy and empathy, turtle and tortoise, national deficit and national debt, girdle and corset, Dirty Harry and Debbie Harry, and so much more...[ continued ]

Ghost Pine: All Stories True​ compiles thirteen years of stories from Nova Scotia-based writer Jeff Miller. Collected from his long-running and glorious Ghost Pine zine, the book travels across Canada and the U.S., taking us on adventures, introducing us to a multitude of curious characters. Through it all, it's Miller's voice that stands out most—an open-hearted tour guide that you'd follow anywhere...[ continued ]

Nothing is as inspirational as Ilse Content. Even when it doesn’t try to be, by its very nature it gives hope and power where there seems to be none. Never ceasing to be interesting and surprising, the first eight years of Ilse Content are collected here for the first time.

Bringing back to life many long out-of-print issues, the first ten volumes are anthologized in this clean and artistically beautiful book from Mend My Dress Press...[ continued ]

One of the best zines ever, collected for the first time. Volume One puts together some long out of print issues, which is definite cause for celebration.

"From scooping chicken salads to selling clothes to shelving books to teacher training, Truckface details years of embarrassment and missteps. This volume contains stories of rowdy backyard brawls, awful customer service, awkward social interactions, underpants dance parties, staying angry and learning how to try...[ continued ]

This volume collects LB's writing from her first five years as a public school teacher. It is at turns powerful, hilarious, sad, inspirational, and always always always amazing. If any zine deserves a 400+ page anthology, it's Truckface.

"Through strikes, standardized testing, violence, bouffant wigs, school closings, and drawings of wieners, Truckface documents the life of one Chicago public school teacher...[ continued ]

A beautiful collection of the first six (long out of print) issues of Mend My Dress - a zine that for years has been constantly impressive in its openness and strength. Seeing it in this form puts into perspective how great it is. It’s also one of the best laid out and cleanest zine collections in book form that I have seen.

“Mend My Dress offers a complex, nuanced, and skillfully constructed picture of multifarious girlhood vulnerability...[ continued ]

“Eight years in the making, One More for the People is the first collection of Martha Grover's zine Somnambulist. Playful, wry, and conversational, One More for the People chronicles three generations in the life of the Grover family. As these idiosyncratic characters reluctantly confront adulthood, one Grover is always there to take notes. But after she's diagnosed with a rare and potentially fatal disease...[ continued ]

One of the best zines around finally gets the book it deserves. A best-of collection that has some amazing pieces from the first five years of Rad Dad. Well-known names like Ian MacKaye, Cory Doctorow, Jeff Chang, Steve Almond are included within, next to many other inspiring radical parents, with editor Tomas Moniz at the helm—constantly reminding the reader to get inspired by life and to see how we teach and treat children as a radical act...[ continued ]

Selections from the long-running zine Tazewell’s Favorite Eccentric, collected into one smartly-designed paperback book.

Within: "growing up poor, queer and lonely in a conservative small town in Virginia, building and losing communities and friendships, loss, abusive relationships, survival, balloon artistry, and finding hope and love."

172 pages, tall trade paperback...[ continued ]

A lot of ground is covered in these six collected issues of Shotgun Seamstress. Golnar Nikpour says it best in her introduction: "this is not (just) a personal zine, not (just) a music zine, not (just) a political zine, but rather an explosive combination of the best of all those DIY traditions."

Through essays, interviews, historical portraits of important artists and scenes, reviews, and so much more, Shotgun Seamstress pays tribute and gives a platform for, "Black feminists, artists, punks, queers, and musicians...[ continued ]