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Comic artists and comic lovers think about comics and the importance of comics in their lives. (They even draw a few along the way.)

Within: A dusty comic book store in the '80s serving as salvation for a geeky teen girl; dealing with Asperger’s and learning social cues from comics; the current state of Heavy Metal; adapting The Secret Garden; a girl in the 70’s and her love of war comics; superheroes; Harvey Pekar; and much much more...[ continued ]

Clock Tower Nine has become one of my new favorite zines. Using a variety-format approach reminiscent of classic '90s zines, Danny Noonan puts together a consistently interesting assortment. Letters, postcards, and the stories of others mix with personal narratives, odd facts, and ephemera.

This issue largely consists of a story about being a roadie for a band, an intercontinental fast friendship through postcards and drunk dials, and a barely-planned cross-country road trip...[ continued ]

The fourth issue of Women in Sound zine is built on a series of great interviews with women, queer, and trans musicians and sound artists. Included within: Gina Favano (of Come Holy Spirit), rapper/producer Sammus, producer/DJ Yaeji, sound engineer Holly Hansen, live sound engineer Carolyn Slothour, post-production engineer Leslie Mona-Mathus, and Portland's own Alissa DeRubeis and Felisha Ledesma (of S1 Synth Library & Women's Beat League)...[ continued ]

An endlessly fun and fascinating zine that reviews celebrity biographies. From Rick James to Three Dog Night, Jayne County to Stevie Nicks, Krazy Kat's George Herriman to Cyndi Lauper, Little House on the Prairie's Laura Ingalls Wilder to Mötley Crüe.

Highly recommended.

28 pages, half-letter size.

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"Do you remember Anita Hill? I was a teenager when she testified that Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her at work. He became a Supreme Court Judge anyway but it was the beginning of anti-harassment policies in the workplace. Anita Hill withstood a lot of criticism and ridicule, most of which had little or nothing to do with her testimony. Here is a reminder that her work and words are important...[ continued ]

Four of Eberhardt Press' famous bird pads. All for $10.

3" x 5", pocket-size, unlined notepads from paper remnants left over from the paper cutter that are too small to print on.

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Last copy! Taking his long-running Paper Radio/Signals zine in a new direction, Tin Can Telephone is DJ Frederick's brand new variety zine. Spanning from personal stories to book reviews and a 1964 hometown murder mystery, it's a fascinating ride. Plus: 40 years of concerts in New Hampshire, in review form (including Cocteau Twins and Odetta!).

20 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to...[ continued ]

In this issue of our favorite Portland photo journal: “Building New Ground." 20 photographers from around the world respond.

With work from: Katherine Akey, Tal Ben Avi, Linda Borst, Craig Buchan, Fergus Coyle, Alexa Cushing, Chris Giuliano, Illesha Khandelwal, Bryan May, Giuseppe Mileti, Svetlana Mladenovic, Azikiwe Mohammed, Paolo Morales, Naveen Naqvi, Kumi Oguro, Joaquin Palting, Rhombie Sandoval, and Jeanette Spicer...[ continued ]

A classic of the Jordan O'Jordan catalog. Molecular love songs. Banjo ballads. Group sing-alongs. Pure genius.

Available on LP and CD.

LP on blue vinyl. Comes with lyric sheet.

Jordan O'Jordan- Little Finger