updating cart, please wait...
Recently Restocked

The latest in Jennifer Williams' well-loved workbook zine series. We Need Emotional Labor: Discussion Questions to Redistribute the Work that Holds Communities Together​ is an essential guide to understanding both the value of emotional labor and the imbalance of it.

In her in-depth introduction, Williams asks, "What toxic systems can be uprooted if we start to wipe away the idea that taking care of each other is a burden?" While also pointing out that "There are questions we need to ask, though, before this giving and receiving: Is it consensual? Is it valued? Is it reciprocal?" (Clementine Morrigan...[ continued ]

A primer on how not to be a dick. Don't Be a Dick! serves as an introductory guide to understanding consent, toxic masculinity, rape culture, the porn industry, and more. Well-written and accessible.

36 pages, half-letter size, revised edition, cover colors vary.

[ continued ]

In Masculinities, Cindy Crabb (Doris) explores how we're each individually taught about what masculinity is. The zine focuses on the role models (positive or problematic or often both) who guided that education and how it played out. As she says in her introduction, she wants to "shake [masculinity] up—look at all the varied ways people are taught what it means to be a man, and where they found resistance, examples of other ways to be...[ continued ]

A strange greeting. In mini journal form. Using an image from Max Ernst's 1941 book, A Week of Kindness or The Seven Deadly Elements Novel.

Blank, unlined white pages. Recycled paper, semi-glossy covers. 3.75" x 5", 40 pages.

[ continued ]

A thrush, a chat, or an old world flycatcher...depending on who you ask.

Cover and unlined paper vary in color. 100% recycled and reused materials. 3“ x 4.5,” 60 pages.

In My Complicated Relationship With Food, Zach discusses his unusual relationship with food by reviewing a variety of (seemingly) simple and common foods. What comes out is uncommonly hilarious and fascinating.

And any zine that starts by saying, "I have weird thoughts about food. I am well aware that many of my ideas are ridiculous and probably wrong" is bound to be something special...[ continued ]

A fun and fascinating gift for basically anyone, The Difference Between compares similar (or similar-sounding) things and provides straightforward definitions for each. Within: baking soda and baking powder, communism and socialism, krump and krunk, sympathy and empathy, turtle and tortoise, national deficit and national debt, girdle and corset, Dirty Harry and Debbie Harry, and so much more...[ continued ]

In a long-form braided essay, Billy McCall takes a hard look at his relationship with his brother. Juxtaposing his brother's substance abuse issues with his own aversion to substances, Proof I Exist #28 becomes a short memoir on family and addiction that's heart-felt and curious. Possibly the best zine yet from this prolific zine author.

40 pages, quarter-size. Risograph-printed...[ continued ]

A wonderful new zine about gleaning, otherwise known as "harvesting surplus produce and giving it to people who otherwise might not have access to fresh fruit and veggies." But it's also so much more than that, as well: Glean Zine is a compact introduction to food waste the world over and how we can begin thinking differently about our food habits.

Gorgeous comics and illustrations from the one-and-only Nicki Sabalu (DIY or Don't We) throughout...[ continued ]

An assortment of postcards from letterpress artist Hope Amico and her long-running Keep Writing postcard project.

Get yourself a pack of five or a pack of ten. You won't regret it.