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A great zine about body image, featuring a wide range of perspectives, all of them fascinating. So many reminders that we all face insecurities about how we look. And that the ways insecurities manifest are unique and universal at the same time.

What ultimately comes out of this series of essays is a lot of hope, a lot of people who have suffered and are now in a good place, or at least a better one...[ continued ]

A comprehensive guide to mental health herbalism! Arranged by symptom rather than plant, this guide is easier to use and more accessible than most. Questioning common views on mental health, the zine also offers a lot of words about living in an out of balance world.

Covered within: anxiety, depression & despair, insomnia, hormone-related stress, substance use & recovery, bipolar, and more...[ continued ]

In What Are You Raising Them For?, Tim Devin looks at the counterculture shifts of the '60s and '70s and sees how it changed the way people parented their kids. Using '70s hippie literature and the experiences of adults raised in nontraditional settings as source material, Tim Devin examines where counterculture parenting ideas were coming from, how well they were working, and what we can take away from it all today...[ continued ]

The second issue of Katie Ash's podcast review and recommendation zine, Listen Up!, is a treat. As always, Katie's passion for these shows leaps off the page and her cut-and-paste layout makes it a joy to read. This issue focuses largely on POC-led podcasts and includes a lot of shows that don't often make recommendation lists. Without a doubt, you'll finish reading and want to put one of these shows on...[ continued ]

A hand-printed graph paper pad of pedal-powered propulsion.

Offset print and made with 100% recycled materials. Spiral-bound, 4.75" x 6.5", 40 sheets, 10 squares per inch.

Last copy! Filling the Void looks at people's various paths to recovery—the assorted ways it can look and the range of things it can mean in a person's life. Focusing on how recovery can happen in the absence of dogma (whether spiritual or straight-edge) and also how it works differently for everyone, Filling the Void is essential reading for everyone, regardless of relationship to alcohol or substances...[ continued ]

Origin stories, séances, astronaut egos, and so many more short stories about (and relationships with) the moon.

Edited by Joseph Carlough at Displaced Snail Publications. With work by: Carolyn Busa, Charlene Kwon, Heather Butts, Hrishikesh Hirway, Jesse Reklaw, Joseph Carlough, Josh Berwanger, Katie Haegele, Kishi Bashi, Kristen Martin, Marguerite Dabaie, Michael Jasorka, Mike Adams, Mocha Ishibashi, Molly Rice, and Thaddeus Rutkowski...[ continued ]

In Masculinities, Cindy Crabb (Doris) explores how we're each individually taught about what masculinity is. The zine focuses on the role models (positive or problematic or often both) who guided that education and how it played out. As she says in her introduction, she wants to "shake [masculinity] up—look at all the varied ways people are taught what it means to be a man, and where they found resistance, examples of other ways to be...[ continued ]

Jennifer Williams' latest workbook zine, The Actual Feeling: Discussion Questions to Name Emotions and Ask for the Support You Need, helps lead readers to the core of their emotional needs. Created out of workshops she led in the wake of the Ghost Ship tragedy and the 2016 election, The Actual Feeling asks its readers to define words in tangible ways in order to better communicate needs and better support others...[ continued ]

A thoughtful zine that asks artists to reexamine how they use Facebook and how Facebook uses them. Not a call to boycott the platform entirely, but to simply think deeply about it and seek solutions beyond it. Written by Paul DeGeorge of Harry & The Potters.

As he so wisely writes in the introduction, Keep Content Off Facebook hopes to give "creative communities a starting point for more closely examining their relationship with Facebook...[ continued ]