updating cart, please wait...
Recently Restocked

Origin stories, séances, astronaut egos, and so many more short stories about (and relationships with) the moon.

Edited by Joseph Carlough at Displaced Snail Publications. With work by: Carolyn Busa, Charlene Kwon, Heather Butts, Hrishikesh Hirway, Jesse Reklaw, Joseph Carlough, Josh Berwanger, Katie Haegele, Kishi Bashi, Kristen Martin, Marguerite Dabaie, Michael Jasorka, Mike Adams, Mocha Ishibashi, Molly Rice, and Thaddeus Rutkowski...[ continued ]

M. Sabine Rear's Reverse Flâneur: On Being Blind, Glamorous, and Alone in Public is a graphic novel travelogue of Vienna. Meditating on the visibly disabled body while spending time in museums and being alone in public spaces. Nominated for an Ignatz Award. 

40 pages, half-letter size, thick matte covers.

[ continued ]

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. She asks us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes...[ continued ]

This issue of the long-running Basic Paper Airplane zine series focuses on interviews—what it means to create that space and all the ways they can succeed or fail. Ten interviews with writers, artists, and musicians that delve into the creative process, identity, family, image, myth, and obsession.

Interviews with: musician Owen Ashworth (Advance Base/Casiotone for the Painfully Alone), essayist Elena Passarello (Animals Strike Curious Poses), poet Casey Fuller (A Fort Made of Doors), musician Erika M...[ continued ]

The ten-year anniversary issue of Basic Paper Airplane! Short essays about trying to make a living from writing words. Comic nightmares from the world of freelance writing, night school, weekly papers, and cities of books.

Paper airplane examples throughout. 32 pages, cut half-letter size.

[ continued ]

The first issue of Behind the Wheel is one of those instant zine classics that only come along every so often. Kelly Dessaint becomes a Lyft driver in a rapidly changing San Francisco and chaos ensues. Dessaint, an old-school zine curmudgeon of the highest order, is the perfect guide for this journey—never bought in, ever out of place, always questioning. 

Within: learning the ropes, techwads, cops, required fist bumps, class war...[ continued ]

​Last copy! In Masculinities, Cindy Crabb (Doris) explores how we're each individually taught about what masculinity is. The zine focuses on the role models (positive or problematic or often both) who guided that education and how it played out. As she says in her introduction, she wants to "shake [masculinity] up—look at all the varied ways people are taught what it means to be a man, and where they found resistance, examples of other ways to be...[ continued ]

Filling the Void looks at people's various paths to recovery—the assorted ways it can look and the range of things it can mean in a person's life. Focusing on how recovery can happen in the absence of dogma (whether spiritual or straight-edge) and also how it works differently for everyone, Filling the Void is essential reading for everyone, regardless of relationship to alcohol or substances...[ continued ]

It Only Gets Worse from Here takes the "handwritten inspirational quote art" genre and makes it bleak, lonely, and hilarious. This tiny zine holds 15 unspirational messages to guide you toward your darkest moments.

This is sure to join the ranks of the most popular publications (How to Talk to Your Cat About Gun Safety, Love is Not Constantly Wondering if You're Making the Biggest Mistake of Your Life, Field Guide to the Aliens of Star Trek the Next Generation) in Zachary Auburn's strange catalog of wholly singular oddities...[ continued ]

The Family Fun Manual, Vol. IV:​ Rainy Day Craft Projects for When Your Country Has Elected a White Supremacist Who Openly Brags About Sexually Assaulting Women leads you through a series of craft projects that not only entertain children, but help guide you through your own Trump era desperation. Or, at least, these craft projects acknowledge that your emotions—your sadness about the state of the world, your fear for the well-being of your loved ones—are consuming every part of your being and cannot be ignored by mindless craft projects...[ continued ]