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Zines

A handy saxophone how-to guide that provides you with new playing positions to liven up your sax life. Written by sax machine Joe DeGeorge, of bands such as Harry and the Potters & the Downtown Boys.

Hand-written text with illustration throughout. 16 pages, half-letter size.

Bending Spoons: A Field Guide to Ableist Microaggressions is an illustrated guide to the types of questions and comments M. Sabine Rear experiences as a blind woman in public. A crucial read for able-bodied people hoping to better understand the experience of living with a disability.

24 pages, oblong quarter-size.

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In this, the 35-year anniversary issue of Cometbus, Aaron interviews cartoonists. Made for both the diehards and those generally wary of comics, the zine is a dive into New York comic culture—from those in the spotlight to those lighting the world behind the scenes.

Interviews with Gabrielle Bell, Robin Enrico, Jeffrey Lewis, Julia Wertz, Bill Kartalopoulos, Gary Panter, Adrian Tomine, Ben Katchor, Paul Levitz, Drew Friedman, Karen Green, Gabe Fowler, Kim Deitch, and Al Jaffee...[ continued ]

A highly enjoyable series of comics adapted from music biographies. Within: Bob Dylan's makeshift Blood on the Tracks backing band, Kurt & Courtney's mac-and-cheese trials, John & Yoko's primal scream therapy, John Coltrane being a good guy, Mike Watt wearing a pumpkin on his head, the feuds of J Mascis & Lou Barlow, and Kristin Hersh's evil self.

40 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

Empathy Exercise places the classroom exercise of putting a blindfold on to imagine being blind against the daily reality of being blind. Through M. Sabine Rear's stunning comic panels, the juxtaposition points out both the limitations of the exercise and the false narratives it perpetuates.

16 pages, oblong quarter-size.

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In her short illustrated essay A Few Good Boys, M. Sabine Rear writes about growing up surrounded by art from straight white men and the hoops she had to go through to relate to it. She also writes about the men she holds onto, and her dread that they might one day be revealed as monsters.

16 pages, quarter-size.

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The second issue of the excellent movies of the 1930s zine, A Great and Terrible Golden Age. Within: a Joan Crawford rich person solo sport montage, Soviet sci-fi, the pompous genius of "the fifth Marx Brother" Margaret Dumont, Greta Garbo's only rom-com, and Ernst Lubitsch galore!

Contributions from Emily Alden Foster, Bethany Simard, Yvonne Li, Emily Parrish, Lindsey Simard, Robert Dynamite, Tessa Brunton, and Joshua James Amberson...[ continued ]

An entire issue of A Great and Terrible Golden Age dedicated to the one-and-only Claudette Colbert. Essays and comics about her controversial (and motion picture industry-altering) boobs in Cecil B. DeMille's 1932 film The Sign of the Cross and her year of ruling Hollywood (1934) when she made It Happened One Night, Cleopatra, Four Frightened People, and Imitation of Life...[ continued ]

Hedwig Lives: The Complete Collection of Fan Theories that Proves Harry Potter's Owl Still Lives is the best Harry Potter conspiracy theory zine around. Meticulous analysis of the source texts by Paul DeGeorge of long-running Harry Potter fan band (and wizard-rock inventors), Harry and the Potters.

Comes with an iron-on patch! (For true believers.)

Illustrations throughout by Cameron Lamontagne...[ continued ]

Ten zinesters talk about an album they love. From The Wipers to The Breeders, Elton John to Ol' Dirty Bastard. With great pieces from Billy McCall (Last Night at the Casino), Katie Haegele (The La-La Theory), and Ed Tillman (Manfiesto). My personal favorite: a delve into five forgotten '90s soundtracks.

I F#cking Love This Album is a quick, fun, and affordable read that has a charming made-on-a-word-processing-program-in-1994 aesthetic...[ continued ]