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Zines

Jennifer Williams' latest workbook zine, The Actual Feeling: Discussion Questions to Name Emotions and Ask for the Support You Need, helps lead readers to the core of their emotional needs. Created out of workshops she led in the wake of the Ghost Ship tragedy and the 2016 election, The Actual Feeling asks its readers to define words in tangible ways in order to better communicate needs and better support others...[ continued ]

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. She asks us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes...[ continued ]

Behind the Zines is a zine about zines. Think of it as a small-scale Broken Pencil or Xerography Debt, a biannual publication that puts a spotlight on what's going on in the zine community. In this issue: scene reports, zine fest travels, zine spreadsheets, zine reluctance, and zine reviews. It asks how personal is too personal, and includes an interview with Kara Comegys of the zine Clumsy, discussing zines, sexual assault, and using art to heal...[ continued ]

A new issue of our favorite zine about zines. And there's just so much good. Kate Foray and Dan Nelson discuss the upswing in wrestling zines. Frederick Moe dives into amateur press associations. Jess Hogan tells the nontraditional story of Neither/Nor Distro and how it can work in other places. Plus words, interviews, and features from some of our faves: Anna Jo Beck, Julia Eff, Kari Tervo, Saeko Reed, and so many more...[ continued ]

A cleanly laid out, accessible guide to making DIY events happen. Perfect for those just getting into organizing DIY events and with reminders and ideas that even the seasoned organizer can benefit from. A strong focus on house shows and radical communities, but a lot of ideas that can function in a lot of DIY event situations.

Put together by Neil Campau (of Electrician and World History) and edited by a ton of really great folks—Fred Thomas, Zoe Boekbinder, CJ Boyd, Danah Olivetree, Dustin Krcatovich, and Jamie Menzel, just to name a few...[ continued ]

Addicting and perfectly bizarre, Cometbus #58 is a story about finding home in a greasy-spoon diner full of combative old-timers. It's a ride full of strangeness and surprises.

44 pages, half-letter size.

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Doris #30 is full of so many treasures: capturing a swarm of bees, finding community in new places, telling tour stories, forming study groups, and so much more. In it's longest and most vital piece, Cindy interviews sexual abuse survivors and meditates on how to think differently about accountability processes.

32 pages, half-legal size.

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A wonderful new zine about gleaning, otherwise known as "harvesting surplus produce and giving it to people who otherwise might not have access to fresh fruit and veggies." But it's also so much more than that, as well: Glean Zine is a compact introduction to food waste the world over and how we can begin thinking differently about our food habits.

Gorgeous comics and illustrations from the one-and-only Nicki Sabalu (DIY or Don't We) throughout...[ continued ]

A thoughtful zine that asks artists to reexamine how they use Facebook and how Facebook uses them. Not a call to boycott the platform entirely, but to simply think deeply about it and seek solutions beyond it. Written by Paul DeGeorge of Harry & The Potters.

As he so wisely writes in the introduction, Keep Content Off Facebook hopes to give "creative communities a starting point for more closely examining their relationship with Facebook...[ continued ]

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to...[ continued ]