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Zines

This issue of 8-Track Mind comes after a ten-year (!) hiatus and is by far one of the best zines I’ve read in a long time. No longer purely an 8-track fanzine, it is now a look at the future of paper media and analog technologies in the digital present.

Editor Russ Forster asks 14 people who have been creating for long enough to be considered legends (from filmmakers to authors, magazine publishers to members of punk bands) the simple question “zines vs...[ continued ]

8-Track Mind is back again and this time it has come to celebrate the analog resurgence. Wildly different pieces spanning a whole range of voices and opinions, with extra commentary from some legends of underground media and music.

8TM never fails to disappoint and has the ability to make you think about something as seemingly simple as music formats as something expansive, something that carries over into other aspects of life...[ continued ]

Part music magazine, part art zine, and part literary journal, Antsy is a notably pleasurable combination of things brought to you by a star-studded cast. Within: editor Dustin Krcatovich interviews street-performer legend The Space Lady and experimental filmmaker Ben Russell. Pop songwriting genius Fred Thomas interviews ambient musician Dominic Coppola. Forest Juziuk brings us into the making of the classic surf-rock novelty record The Ventures in Space...[ continued ]

Under the banner of "lost and found," this issue of the Cat Party zine has comics, essays, and illustrations from Rebecca Bayuk, Kelsey Stewart, Dino Caruso, Marylyn Martin-Weatherly, Adam Wollett, Joseph Carlough, and Eden Shale.

32 pages, half-letter size.

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In an attempt to figure out the last record he would ever sell, Danny Noonan writes the story of a skittish teenager’s discovery of punk that leads him to house shows and eventually a move across the country. It’s a celebration of record stores that spans 25 years and explores the anxiety of youth, the community of punk, and how much it sucks not to be able to find a job when you need it the most...[ continued ]

In a series of interviews with queer women and non-binary folks, Fear, Safety, & Femmes examines what safety looks like. What places and people create a sense of safety? Which qualities in people create a sense of danger? What self-defense tools and techniques do people use to feel safer?

20 pages, cut half-letter size.

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The second issue of the excellent movies of the 1930s zine, A Great and Terrible Golden Age. Within: a Joan Crawford rich person solo sport montage, Soviet sci-fi, the pompous genius of "the fifth Marx Brother" Margaret Dumont, Greta Garbo's only rom-com, and Ernst Lubitsch galore!

Contributions from Emily Alden Foster, Bethany Simard, Yvonne Li, Emily Parrish, Lindsey Simard, Robert Dynamite, Tessa Brunton, and Joshua James Amberson...[ continued ]

Ten zinesters talk about an album they love. From The Wipers to The Breeders, Elton John to Ol' Dirty Bastard. With great pieces from Billy McCall (Last Night at the Casino), Katie Haegele (The La-La Theory), and Ed Tillman (Manfiesto). My personal favorite: a delve into five forgotten '90s soundtracks.

I F#cking Love This Album is a quick, fun, and affordable read that has a charming made-on-a-word-processing-program-in-1994 aesthetic...[ continued ]

A buffet of wildly different work from cartoonists, essayists, poets, and illustrators. With contributions from some of our faves: Jeff Miller (Ghost Pine) on the childhood confusion caused by a Sex Pistols tape, comic artist John Porcellino (King Cat Comics) on hidden creeks, Cherry Styles (Synchronise Witches Press) on natural skin care, and comic artist Jason Martin (Black Tea) on underrated albums...[ continued ]

Though The Lowbrow Reader makes itself out to be a low-quality bathroom reader it is, in reality, a one-of-a-kind zine that holds some of the wisest and oddest essays about bygone pop culture and its fringes.

In this issue: famed cartoonist Drew Friedman writes about his love for Shemp Howard of the Three Stooges. Fast Times at Ridgemont High/Clueless director Amy Heckerling digs up a private diary...[ continued ]