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Zines

This issue of 8-Track Mind comes after a ten-year (!) hiatus and is by far one of the best zines I’ve read in a long time. No longer purely an 8-track fanzine, it is now a look at the future of paper media and analog technologies in the digital present.

Editor Russ Forster asks 14 people who have been creating for long enough to be considered legends (from filmmakers to authors, magazine publishers to members of punk bands) the simple question “zines vs...[ continued ]

8-Track Mind is back again and this time it has come to celebrate the analog resurgence. Wildly different pieces spanning a whole range of voices and opinions, with extra commentary from some legends of underground media and music.

8TM never fails to disappoint and has the ability to make you think about something as seemingly simple as music formats as something expansive, something that carries over into other aspects of life...[ continued ]

Nearly thirty years into its existence, 8-Track Mind still manages a weirdness few other zines have. Loosely dedicated to an obsession with 8-track tapes, in issue 104, the "Cartridge Family" ostensibly work under the theme of "the commodification of nostalgia" and let whatever happens happen. 

Within: a series of oddball fables, 8-track Terminator, a Muskegon Eight-Track story, So Wrong They're Right, the scam of 8-track eBay, and so much more...[ continued ]

The ten-year anniversary issue of Basic Paper Airplane! Short essays about trying to make a living from writing words. Comic nightmares from the world of freelance writing, night school, weekly papers, and cities of books.

Paper airplane examples throughout. 32 pages, cut half-letter size.

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The first issue of Behind the Wheel is one of those instant zine classics that only come along every so often. Kelly Dessaint becomes a Lyft driver in a rapidly changing San Francisco and chaos ensues. Dessaint, an old-school zine curmudgeon of the highest order, is the perfect guide for this journey—never bought in, ever out of place, always questioning. 

Within: learning the ropes, techwads, cops, required fist bumps, class war...[ continued ]

In the second issue of Behind the Wheel, Kelly Dessaint, in addition to doing Lyft, becomes an Uber driver and brings us behind the scenes of the so-called sharing economy—in all its less-than-glamorous glory.

Within: sex clubs, tech bros, bottled water entitlement, a thousand iPhones, plus $500 and a taco. 

60 pages, half-letter size. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series...[ continued ]

An exploration of the body, one part at a time, by Tomas Moniz. Written as poems, but reading more like vignettes or small essays about how complicated it is just to exist in your own frame. These pieces are sweet, emotionally heavy, sexy, and sometimes really funny. They are so honest that it leaves you wishing for that same openness in yourself, to be so unashamed of what we carry around and what we desire...[ continued ]

Mini story-essays about tigers, Henri Rousseau, Yelp as a personal blog, Jorge Luis Borges, freight elevator rides, landlords with enemies, and more.

32 pages, quarter-size.

Though The Lowbrow Reader makes itself out to be a low-quality bathroom reader it is, in reality, a one-of-a-kind zine that holds some of the wisest and oddest essays about bygone pop culture and its fringes.

In this issue: famed cartoonist Drew Friedman writes about his love for Shemp Howard of the Three Stooges. Fast Times at Ridgemont High/Clueless director Amy Heckerling digs up a private diary...[ continued ]

Origin stories, séances, astronaut egos, and so many more short stories about (and relationships with) the moon.

Edited by Joseph Carlough at Displaced Snail Publications. With work by: Carolyn Busa, Charlene Kwon, Heather Butts, Hrishikesh Hirway, Jesse Reklaw, Joseph Carlough, Josh Berwanger, Katie Haegele, Kishi Bashi, Kristen Martin, Marguerite Dabaie, Michael Jasorka, Mike Adams, Mocha Ishibashi, Molly Rice, and Thaddeus Rutkowski...[ continued ]