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Zines

Long-time zinester Liz Mason and her husband Joe Mason take on the subject of secret societies ("Masons on Masons.") Highly informative and incredibly cheeky histories of the Masons, the Illuminati, and more.

48 pages, half-letter size.

Believe it. A gloriously odd collection of interlinked short stories based on the lives and careers of past and present members of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Within: "Red Hot Chili Parents," "Rick Rubin's Mansion," and "Retired Hot Chili Peppers," culminating at the end into something truly unexpected.

52 pages, half-letter size.

Synopsis: The year is 2024 and the Red Hot Chili Peppers prepare to make their grandest musical statement yet—but is it already too late? In this three-part speculative fan fiction, the funk-punk legends must overcome self-doubt, creative blockades and a crumbling music industry in order to save all of rock music from irrelevance...[ continued ]

Intricately restaging images from the '40s, '50s and '60s and using herself and her friends as models, artist Lenae Day creates some of the most brilliant and strange pieces of art. Blurring the lines between social commentary, absurdity, memoir, humor, and art, Day Magazine is sure to entertain and confuse. Highly recommended.

Magazine size, color and black & white images, 16 pages...[ continued ]

The life and times of a Hollywood dynasty that never existed, as created by conceptual artist Lenae Day. Brilliant, hilarious, and unlike anything else.

"On the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the death of illustrious film star and magnate Priscilla Prescott, Day Magazine reissued its special tell-all edition originally published April 10th, 1989. 'Remembering Priscilla Prescott' traces the life and loves, tragedies and triumphs, and intrigues and escapades of that Hollywood dynasty that you love to hate...[ continued ]

From one of the most intellectual, nerdy, and low budget cult television shows every made, Tyler Hauck chronicles some pretty sincere life lessons. Perhaps showing, in much the same way that MST3K did, that "You don't have to just swallow media," but can use (even the best media) as a jumping off point into some form of greater understanding.

Lessons are interspersed with "Best of" and "Worst of" lists, plenty of stills from the show, and more...[ continued ]

In Last Night at the Casino, Billy gives us a glimpse at casino life from the eyes of a newbie dealer. His love of oddballs and openness to just about any kind of situation makes him the perfect host for this adventure. Fun, just a touch heartbreaking, and a great sociological study on a subject I’ve never seen any other zine take on.

32 pages, quarter-size.

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After five years working the late night shift, Billy switches to the early morning shift. From nocturnal life to farmer hours. This is a zine about how some things change and some things stay the same.

36 pages, quarter-size.

Last copy! A thick issue of LNatC, piles of stories. Dress shoes, co-workers, pressing bets, drawings by Chris Pernula (of Moral Fiber zine).

56 pages, quarter-size.

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Though The Lowbrow Reader makes itself out to be a low-quality bathroom reader it is, in reality, a one-of-a-kind zine that holds some of the wisest and oddest essays about bygone pop culture and its fringes.

In this issue: famed cartoonist Drew Friedman writes about his love for Shemp Howard of the Three Stooges. Fast Times at Ridgemont High/Clueless director Amy Heckerling digs up a private diary...[ continued ]

Last two copies! In their first issue since their Drag City anthology, The Lowbrow Reader brings us new writing from Rick Moranis, cartoons by Gilbert Gottfried, an essay about filming Easy Money with Rodney Dangerfield, bizarre comic book history, and a career-spanning essay on the aforementioned cartoonist that goes to unexpected places. Also within: Partying with Harry Nilsson...[ continued ]