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Zines

This issue of 8-Track Mind comes after a ten-year (!) hiatus and is by far one of the best zines I’ve read in a long time. No longer purely an 8-track fanzine, it is now a look at the future of paper media and analog technologies in the digital present.

Editor Russ Forster asks 14 people who have been creating for long enough to be considered legends (from filmmakers to authors, magazine publishers to members of punk bands) the simple question “zines vs...[ continued ]

8-Track Mind is back again and this time it has come to celebrate the analog resurgence. Wildly different pieces spanning a whole range of voices and opinions, with extra commentary from some legends of underground media and music.

8TM never fails to disappoint and has the ability to make you think about something as seemingly simple as music formats as something expansive, something that carries over into other aspects of life...[ continued ]

Nearly thirty years into its existence, 8-Track Mind still manages a weirdness few other zines have. Loosely dedicated to an obsession with 8-track tapes, in issue 104, the "Cartridge Family" ostensibly work under the theme of "the commodification of nostalgia" and let whatever happens happen. 

Within: a series of oddball fables, 8-track Terminator, a Muskegon Eight-Track story, So Wrong They're Right, the scam of 8-track eBay, and so much more...[ continued ]

This issue of the long-running Basic Paper Airplane zine series focuses on interviews—what it means to create that space and all the ways they can succeed or fail. Ten interviews with writers, artists, and musicians that delve into the creative process, identity, family, image, myth, and obsession.

Interviews with: musician Owen Ashworth (Advance Base/Casiotone for the Painfully Alone), essayist Elena Passarello (Animals Strike Curious Poses), poet Casey Fuller (A Fort Made of Doors), musician Erika M...[ continued ]

In an attempt to figure out the last record he would ever sell, Danny Noonan writes the story of a skittish teenager’s discovery of punk that leads him to house shows and eventually a move across the country. It’s a celebration of record stores that spans 25 years and explores the anxiety of youth, the community of punk, and how much it sucks not to be able to find a job when you need it the most...[ continued ]

The second issue of the excellent movies of the 1930s zine, A Great and Terrible Golden Age. Within: a Joan Crawford rich person solo sport montage, Soviet sci-fi, the pompous genius of "the fifth Marx Brother" Margaret Dumont, Greta Garbo's only rom-com, and Ernst Lubitsch galore!

Contributions from Emily Alden Foster, Bethany Simard, Yvonne Li, Emily Parrish, Lindsey Simard, Robert Dynamite, Tessa Brunton, and Joshua James Amberson...[ continued ]

An entire issue of A Great and Terrible Golden Age dedicated to the one-and-only Claudette Colbert. Essays and comics about her controversial (and motion picture industry-altering) boobs in Cecil B. DeMille's 1932 film The Sign of the Cross and her year of ruling Hollywood (1934) when she made It Happened One Night, Cleopatra, Four Frightened People, and Imitation of Life...[ continued ]

A thoughtful zine that asks artists to reexamine how they use Facebook and how Facebook uses them. Not a call to boycott the platform entirely, but to simply think deeply about it and seek solutions beyond it. Written by Paul DeGeorge of Harry & The Potters.

As he so wisely writes in the introduction, Keep Content Off Facebook hopes to give "creative communities a starting point for more closely examining their relationship with Facebook...[ continued ]

An endlessly fun and fascinating zine that reviews celebrity biographies. From Rick James to Three Dog Night, Jayne County to Stevie Nicks, Krazy Kat's George Herriman to Cyndi Lauper, Little House on the Prairie's Laura Ingalls Wilder to Mötley Crüe.

Highly recommended.

28 pages, half-letter size.

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Picking Stuff Apart (also known as Eaves of Ass #8 & Basic Paper Airplane #11) is a collection of reviews of life and art. An industrial music award ceremony, Meetup groups, books, films, and dated Christian television—all looked at deeply and discussed.

Within: "Life After an Impossible Book," "The Tyranny of the Weird Kid Table," "The Prevalence of Satanic Preschools," and much more...[ continued ]