updating cart, please wait...
Zines

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. She asks us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes...[ continued ]

The first issue of Behind the Wheel is one of those instant zine classics that only come along every so often. Kelly Dessaint becomes a Lyft driver in a rapidly changing San Francisco and chaos ensues. Dessaint, an old-school zine curmudgeon of the highest order, is the perfect guide for this journey—never bought in, ever out of place, always questioning. 

Within: learning the ropes, techwads, cops, required fist bumps, class war...[ continued ]

In the second issue of Behind the Wheel, Kelly Dessaint, in addition to doing Lyft, becomes an Uber driver and brings us behind the scenes of the so-called sharing economy—in all its less-than-glamorous glory.

Within: sex clubs, tech bros, bottled water entitlement, a thousand iPhones, plus $500 and a taco. 

60 pages, half-letter size. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series...[ continued ]

Last copy! This long-awaited new issue of Behind the Wheel comes a few years into Kelly's stint as a licensed cab drive, and he's in full politicized grumpy cabbie mode for this one. A continuation of his look at an ever-changing San Francisco and a nuanced take-down of Uber and Lyft, this issue of Behind the Wheel looks at the realities and logistics of surviving and supporting a family as a driver for hire...[ continued ]

With the hyperbolic zeal and rancor of a true bookseller, Aaron Cometbus brings to life his chosen family: the booksellers of New York City. A Bestiary of Booksellers is for anyone who has sold books long enough to have it seep into their identity, but it’s also for all manner of book addicts, subculture scholars, obsessives, and night owls.

112 pages, half-letter size, perfect-bound...[ continued ]

Addicting and perfectly bizarre, Cometbus #58 is a story about finding home in a greasy-spoon diner full of combative old-timers. It's a ride full of strangeness and surprises.

44 pages, half-letter size.

[ continued ]

How Restaurants Work is an art zine about working restaurant jobs. As Sarah says in the introduction, it's "an elegy, a eulogy, and a damnation...It is a zine about how the people whose work is to feed you get through their days while working to feed you."

Weird food photos, strange receipts, and words about the reality and injustices of food service.

Full color. 40 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to...[ continued ]

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines...[ continued ]

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more...[ continued ]