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Zines

The best zine I've read this year. Vignettes about slowly figuring out life alongside boys: First zine, first tattoo, first out-of-town show, first basement punk show, carrying a teething baby in Helsinki, hopping in a tour van, and what it feels like to be a joyous rusted relic on the dance floor.

The last quarter of the zine is a series of vignettes in tribute to a friend who passed away...[ continued ]

This issue of Muchacha fanzine explores identity, place, discrimination, and the education system through essays, poems, photos, and collage. Features an interview with the great zinester and illustrator Cristy C. Road about her graphic novel Spit and Passion. Plus: a tribute to Borderlands/La Frontera author Gloria Anzaldua, a spotlight on Latinx musicians, and so much more...[ continued ]

This brand new issue of Somnambulist documents a conversation happening between Portland and Amsterdam. Discussions of place, travel, race, language, and privilege. Culture and climate, bikes and cars, joy and heartbreak. Thoroughly engaging throughout! Highly recommended.

60 pages, half-letter size, silkscreened covers.

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In the new issue of our favorite literary zine, seven writers take us around the world—from ancient ruins to the room of a nursing home—while writing under the theme of "Away."

Featuring work from: Charles Reaves, Andria Alefhi, Colette Hannahan, Betsy Houston, Pam Daghlian, M.P. McCune, and Lauren Georgia.

44 pages, quarter-size, color covers. Cover art by Portland's very own collage artist extraordinaire, Kevin Sampsell...[ continued ]

After over a decade in Portland, Oregon, Zach and his wife decide to move out before everything that was once good about the city gets sold off to the highest bidder. They decide on Zach's hometown of Rochester, New York and attempt to get their vintage home goods business, animals, and various belongings across the country. (Spoiler: Everything goes wrong.)

The same tragicomedy that Zach brought to his bestselling book Love is Not Constantly Wondering if You're Making the Biggest Mistake of Your Life is in full effect here...[ continued ]

There are a lot of things I love about this little zine. Its subject, for one (hometowns!). But also its wonderful nostalgia, its sadness, its subtle beauty. I also love that most the authors seem to be in their early to mid-30's and have this tempered idealism. Many are coming home or pining for home, or wanting to find home, or wishing they'd got out and it's so beautiful and tragic, all at once...[ continued ]

A beautiful reprint of the second issue of Where You From, the zine about hometowns. Various authors (including our own Joshua James Amberson) give their thoughts on where they’re from. And it’s wonderful. A fascinating study of place, home, community, identity, and so much more.

Edited by Hope Amico of the great Keep Loving, Keep Fighting zine and the[ continued ]

Last copy! Five short stories about leaving and five short stories about returning from Hope Amico (Keep Loving, Keep Fighting). New Orleans after the hurricane, New Hampshire, Boston, Milan.

A reversible eight-page mini zine made from one sheet of thick cardstock paper.

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Reflections on life in late '80s/early '90s small town New Hampshire, set against major news events of the time period. From the Challenger explosion to the L.A. Riots to hometown police brutality, Hope covers a lot of ground and does it well.

She reflects on her teenage perception of these events and the discussions she wishes teachers and family would have had around them, but also leaves space to think about what draws people to her home state and tell the story of a spiritual path that started with a minimum wage job bussing tables...[ continued ]

In this, the fifth issue of Hope Amico's long-running Where You From zine series, she examines the idea of moving back home to a place you are not from. A year-long commute between Baton Rogue and New Orleans serves as the jumping point into stories, observation, and endless conversations about home and place. As always, a zine very worth picking up.

Includes an 11" x 17" New Orleans hand-drawn map with photos...[ continued ]