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Zines

Part music magazine, part art zine, and part literary journal, Antsy is a notably pleasurable combination of things brought to you by a star-studded cast. Within: editor Dustin Krcatovich interviews street-performer legend The Space Lady and experimental filmmaker Ben Russell. Pop songwriting genius Fred Thomas interviews ambient musician Dominic Coppola. Forest Juziuk brings us into the making of the classic surf-rock novelty record The Ventures in Space...[ continued ]

An exploration of the body, one part at a time, by Tomas Moniz. Written as poems, but reading more like vignettes or small essays about how complicated it is just to exist in your own frame. These pieces are sweet, emotionally heavy, sexy, and sometimes really funny. They are so honest that it leaves you wishing for that same openness in yourself, to be so unashamed of what we carry around and what we desire...[ continued ]

Tomas Moniz is an expert at being hilarious, tragic, sexy, and profound in a single bound. Even in a single sentence. The poetry and poetic prose in Dirty has so many lines that should be read aloud. Lines that should start conversations. Lines that should make us want to write our own lines. This is a zine to be read over and over again. Highly recommended.

20 pages, quarter-size...[ continued ]

Grub is, as Cherry Styles calls it, "a scrapbook." It's a broad take on food and feelings, politics and potions, from a wide array of contributors. It's packed with essays, comics, poems, and plenty of recipes. Some highlights: drinking coffee with a Greek grandma, life as a Portuguese vegan, the metaphorical power of food and the body, the perfect M.F.K. Fisher quote. 

With contributions from: Brigid Elva, Bunny Michael, Joana Matias, SBTL CLNG, Rebecca May Johnson, Aimee Herman, Francesca Kritikos, Stevie Mackenzie Smith, Alicia Rodriguez, Jessica Mendham, Saffa Kahn, Francesca Riley, Beth Maiden, Julian Bradley, Craig Pollard, Lucy Dearlove, and Ben McDonald...[ continued ]

The first issue of Ilse Content in years is a perfect, small treasure. In a series of prose poems about journeys, small joys, daily heartbreaks, and finding home, Alexis Wolf looks at the ways we connect and the moments we create.

28 page, quarter-size.

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Pissing in a River looks at Patti Smith from a wide variety of angles. Essays about falling in love with her in the '70s, '80s, '90s, today, and not falling in love with her at all. Plus comics, portraits, poems, letters, and more. A great fanzine that manages to consider Patti as a complex and powerful person, a human making mistakes, and an inspiration, all at once.

From the UK press Synchronise Witches...[ continued ]

Two poetry zines in one by Tomas Moniz. In A Poetic Theory of Plate Tectonics, he looks at bodies in relation to the various movements of the earth. And in A Reclamation of Manhood, he looks at past joys and mistakes in an attempt to unlearn the socialized expectations of what manhood and fatherhood looks like.

With art from Ajuan Mance, Robert Liu-Trujillo, and Alicia Dornadic...[ continued ]

This issue of Pro Wrestling Feelings goes deep. There's an epic and fascinating interview with transgender poet Colette Arrand about wrestling as literary muse and her stints as a wrestler and commentator. Willow Maclay has an excellent essay on wrestling as cinema, and the sport's roots in both carnival shows and theater. There's also an interview with Dr. Jess Krenek about female pro-wrestling fandom and academia, as well as comics, poems, the dream match, and much more...[ continued ]

Inspiring, fun, heartbreaking, glorious prose poems by Tomas Moniz. Read it and go out into the world feeling ready for anything.

36 pages, quarter-size.

In Tranquility, or The Virtue of Realizing Your Self-Worth: Avoiding, Accepting and Combating Depression, Racism, and Other Demons, César Ramirez takes on a wide array of life experiences in a small amount of space. Within: the day John Wayne shot his dad, being a teacher of color, and finding pride in a name that no one can quite say.

16 pages, half-letter size.

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