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Zines

A cleanly laid out, accessible guide to making DIY events happen. Perfect for those just getting into organizing DIY events and with reminders and ideas that even the seasoned organizer can benefit from. A strong focus on house shows and radical communities, but a lot of ideas that can function in a lot of DIY event situations.

Put together by Neil Campau (of Electrician and World History) and edited by a ton of really great folks—Fred Thomas, Zoe Boekbinder, CJ Boyd, Danah Olivetree, Dustin Krcatovich, and Jamie Menzel, just to name a few...[ continued ]

Cometbus #55 could be looked at two ways: A treatise on growing up without giving up, or proof that even the most dedicated proponent of youth culture grows old. Either way, it’s fascinating. It’s coming from a life in punk, leftist politics, and DIY culture, but you don’t need to be interested in any of that to be interested in the stories he tells.

72 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

Doris #30 is full of so many treasures: capturing a swarm of bees, finding community in new places, telling tour stories, forming study groups, and so much more. In it's longest and most vital piece, Cindy interviews sexual abuse survivors and meditates on how to think differently about accountability processes.

32 pages, half-legal size.

[ continued ]

A great issue of Doris. Thinking about what it means to both have close friends and be part of a community. Gratitude for the life lessons Mom taught. A conversation with imprisoned environmental activist Marius Mason. And the first interview in Cindy Crabb's "Anarchists Over 40" series, with Portland's own Icky Dunn of the Justseeds Arts Collective.

48 pages, oblong quarter-size...[ continued ]

“Jane was a clandestine abortion counseling service which effectively provided safe, humane services to thousands of women prior to the legalization of abortion in 1973. Jane is an inspiration a beautiful example of the battles that can be won without begging, of women taking their lives into their own hands and taking responsibility for their actions.” - Eberhardt Press.

Includes an interview with former Jane member Judith Arcana...[ continued ]

Keesha and Joanie and Jane is a fictional story where, in a not-too-distant future, abortion is made illegal in the United States. Young women inspired by the work of Jane, the Chicago pre-Roe v Wade underground abortion service, get a grant to bring the original "Janes" to town to speak at their school as an excuse to talk out how to make their own underground abortion service.

Written by Portland author Judith Arcana —one of the original Janes —and brilliantly formatted like a Broadway Playbill by Eberhardt Press...[ continued ]

A thoughtful zine that asks artists to reexamine how they use Facebook and how Facebook uses them. Not a call to boycott the platform entirely, but to simply think deeply about it and seek solutions beyond it. Written by Paul DeGeorge of Harry & The Potters.

As he so wisely writes in the introduction, Keep Content Off Facebook hopes to give "creative communities a starting point for more closely examining their relationship with Facebook...[ continued ]

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to...[ continued ]

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines...[ continued ]

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more...[ continued ]