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Zines

The first issue of Behind the Wheel is one of those instant zine classics that only come along every so often. Kelly Dessaint becomes a Lyft driver in a rapidly changing San Francisco and chaos ensues. Dessaint, an old-school zine curmudgeon of the highest order, is the perfect guide for this journey—never bought in, ever out of place, always questioning. 

Within: learning the ropes, techwads, cops, required fist bumps, class war...[ continued ]

In the second issue of Behind the Wheel, Kelly Dessaint, in addition to doing Lyft, becomes an Uber driver and brings us behind the scenes of the so-called sharing economy—in all its less-than-glamorous glory.

Within: sex clubs, tech bros, bottled water entitlement, a thousand iPhones, plus $500 and a taco. 

60 pages, half-letter size. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series...[ continued ]

Last copy! This long-awaited new issue of Behind the Wheel comes a few years into Kelly's stint as a licensed cab drive, and he's in full politicized grumpy cabbie mode for this one. A continuation of his look at an ever-changing San Francisco and a nuanced take-down of Uber and Lyft, this issue of Behind the Wheel looks at the realities and logistics of surviving and supporting a family as a driver for hire...[ continued ]

Behind the Zines is a zine about zines. Think of it as a small-scale Broken Pencil or Xerography Debt, a biannual publication that puts a spotlight on what's going on in the zine community. In this issue: scene reports, zine fest travels, zine spreadsheets, zine reluctance, and zine reviews. It asks how personal is too personal, and includes an interview with Kara Comegys of the zine Clumsy, discussing zines, sexual assault, and using art to heal...[ continued ]

Clock Tower Nine has become one of my new favorite zines. Using a variety-format approach reminiscent of classic '90s zines, Danny Noonan puts together a consistently interesting assortment. Letters, postcards, and the stories of others mix with personal narratives, odd facts, and ephemera.

This issue largely consists of a story about being a roadie for a band, an intercontinental fast friendship through postcards and drunk dials, and a barely-planned cross-country road trip...[ continued ]

Jonas (Cheer the Eff Up) brings us robot prayers, letters, road stories, punk shows, video store stories, A Zinester's Guide to Stupidity, and much more. All the while trying to figure out how to make sense of all the heartbreak and oppression in the world. 

64 pages, half-letter size.

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The first issue of Ilse Content in years is a perfect, small treasure. In a series of prose poems about journeys, small joys, daily heartbreaks, and finding home, Alexis Wolf looks at the ways we connect and the moments we create.

28 page, quarter-size.

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Last copy! A travelogue through grief and groceries, far off fields, parks in summer. Oddly singular, this beautifully laid out zine reads like a picture book for daydreamers with complex feelings.

By Bristol comic artist Simon Moreton, author of the Plans We Made graphic novel.

88 pages, oblong A5 size.

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Dreamy comics about road trips, spreading ashes by the unmanned radar station, covering The Wipers, and getting lost in a bog.

Minor Leagues #4 lets you wander in the dream before coming to at the end with a fold-out sheet that gives the larger story around each real-life comic. 

82 pages, A5 size.

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Marked down due to shelf wear! In this, the GIANT fifth issue of Minor Leagues, Simon Moreton's dreamy, time-traveling diary comics blend with long pieces of prose. Within: Finding meaning in place, being in nature, moving through loss, living with ghosts.

66 pages, magazine-size, also comes with a free 12-page mini-zine of drawings and photos.

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