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Zines

The ten-year anniversary issue of Basic Paper Airplane! Short essays about trying to make a living from writing words. Comic nightmares from the world of freelance writing, night school, weekly papers, and cities of books.

Paper airplane examples throughout. 32 pages, cut half-letter size.

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The Seattle zine Clock Tower Nine is a perfect assortment of oddities. Pinball history, Cleveland novelty shirts, postcard lessons, jukebox stories. All I can say is I want every issue from here on out.

20 pages, half-letter size.

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Clock Tower Nine has become one of my new favorite zines. Using a variety-format approach reminiscent of classic '90s zines, Danny Noonan puts together a consistently interesting assortment. Letters, postcards, and the stories of others mix with personal narratives, odd facts, and ephemera.

This issue largely consists of a story about being a roadie for a band, an intercontinental fast friendship through postcards and drunk dials, and a barely-planned cross-country road trip...[ continued ]

In an attempt to figure out the last record he would ever sell, Danny Noonan writes the story of a skittish teenager’s discovery of punk that leads him to house shows and eventually a move across the country. It’s a celebration of record stores that spans 25 years and explores the anxiety of youth, the community of punk, and how much it sucks not to be able to find a job when you need it the most...[ continued ]

The world of work as a woman, explored through comics, essays, and other surprising and interesting forms. All great. Best part: the work histories of the authors' moms and grandmas.

56 pages, half-letter size.

Mini story-essays about tigers, Henri Rousseau, Yelp as a personal blog, Jorge Luis Borges, freight elevator rides, landlords with enemies, and more.

32 pages, quarter-size.

Last copy! In this issue of Let it Sink, "A Short & Inaccurate History of Songs, Sounds, & Imagined Needs," Jim Joyce takes us from punk shows to classrooms, covering French recording history and boiling records. Consistently one of the most intriguing zines running.

52 pages, triangular quarter-size. Plus a scratch ticket at the end.

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Though The Lowbrow Reader makes itself out to be a low-quality bathroom reader it is, in reality, a one-of-a-kind zine that holds some of the wisest and oddest essays about bygone pop culture and its fringes.

In this issue: famed cartoonist Drew Friedman writes about his love for Shemp Howard of the Three Stooges. Fast Times at Ridgemont High/Clueless director Amy Heckerling digs up a private diary...[ continued ]

Last copy! The first zine from the Brooklyn monthly performance showcase, New American Comedy. Within: A complete list of sins, a new kind of prohibition, Michael Jackson's ghost, what happens after you steal a good joke, and so much more.

Edited by Zach Mandeville of Funwater Awesome zine fame. Art by Angelica Blevins. Includes work from Peter Smith, Owen Bates, Ryland Duncan, Laura Ornella, Patti Harrison, Irene Merrow, Dekunle, Steven Markow, Zach Mandeville, Fits, Hannah Boone, Seth Simons, and Catherine Cohen...[ continued ]

Dug up from the out-of-print depths, this classic zine is a perfect gathering of Moe Bowstern's words in one place. Taking pieces previously published in other zines (including some of the '90s greats like Nosedive and Mudflap), Second Set Out has stories that never made it to the pages of her legendary Xtra Tuf zine. Within: fishing boat adventures, hitchhiking tales, an abortion story, the praises for long-distance bus travel, and so much more...[ continued ]