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Zines

Nearly thirty years into its existence, 8-Track Mind still manages a weirdness few other zines have. Loosely dedicated to an obsession with 8-track tapes, in issue 104, the "Cartridge Family" ostensibly work under the theme of "the commodification of nostalgia" and let whatever happens happen. 

Within: a series of oddball fables, 8-track Terminator, a Muskegon Eight-Track story, So Wrong They're Right, the scam of 8-track eBay, and so much more...[ continued ]

The first issue of Fred Thomas' Balcony, a highly enjoyable take on the now-rare music-focused variety zine. Balcony is a joy. The brilliant opening essay (on the naming of zines and bands and season three of Jersey Shore) brought me back to a golden era of zines that I often long for, and the rest of the zine stays on this bright path with a short history of post-punk, a list, and an interview with sound artist Andrea Pensado...[ continued ]

In this issue of Balcony there's a public apology, an essay about Lewis Hyde's The Gift, an interview with left-field hip-hop musician Sterling Toles, in-depth record reviews, and a couple poems by Charles Gonsalves. But as in every issue of Balcony, it's also much more than that. A surprising, quietly exceptional zine.

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

[ continued ]

"A funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done." So begins the third issue of Balcony, the publishing outlet of musician Fred Thomas (Saturday Looks Good to Me, City Center).

Interviews with long-running New Zealand experimental rock band The Dead C, cultish songwriter Edith Frost, and ambient musician John Daniel of Forest Management...[ continued ]

Last copy! Clock Tower Nine has become one of my new favorite zines. Using a variety-format approach reminiscent of classic '90s zines, Danny Noonan puts together a consistently interesting assortment. Letters, postcards, and the stories of others mix with personal narratives, odd facts, and ephemera.

This issue largely consists of a story about being a roadie for a band, an intercontinental fast friendship through postcards and drunk dials, and a barely-planned cross-country road trip...[ continued ]

One of our favorite Seattle zines is back with tales from the record store counter, long walks in various locales, dangerous doppelgängers, and 8-track tapes. 

As Clock Tower Nine ringleader Danny Noonan describes it in the introduction: "This fanzine is like a bunch of people sitting around a fire in late fall, all taking turns telling a story."

24 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

It's finally here: the new zine from our all-time best-selling zinester, Gina Sarti! Welcome to DRIVEL, her new zine series, an old-school variety zine in all its glory. You never know what you're going to get when you turn the page! It's fun. This first issue is broadly themed around all things new.

Within: new words, new homes, new calls to action, new motivations. In-depth interviews with new loves and new friends...[ continued ]

Since 1991, Fluke has been creating great variety zines covering all realms of punk and underground culture. This new issue is particularly PACKED with goodness. Interviews with graphic novelist Nate Powell (March, Any Empire, Swallow Me Whole), mural artist Danny Martin, and skateboard magazine historian Kevin Marks (Look Back Library). Personal histories on Maximum Rocknroll, R...[ continued ]

Mini story-essays about tigers, Henri Rousseau, Yelp as a personal blog, Jorge Luis Borges, freight elevator rides, landlords with enemies, and more.

32 pages, quarter-size.

Temporary sale! A buffet of wildly different work from cartoonists, essayists, poets, and illustrators. With contributions from some of our faves: Jeff Miller (Ghost Pine) on the childhood confusion caused by a Sex Pistols tape, comic artist John Porcellino (King Cat Comics) on hidden creeks, Cherry Styles (Synchronise Witches Press) on natural skin care, and comic artist Jason Martin (Black Tea) on underrated albums...[ continued ]