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Zines

The first issue of Listen Up! is a fantastic introduction to podcasts for the uninitiated, a guide for those looking to expand their horizons, and a personal story of interacting and connecting with the form over the course of many years. From Portland's own Katie Ash (Aubade zine).

Fun cut-and-paste layout. 24 pages, half-letter size. Block-printed covers.

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The second issue of Katie Ash's podcast review and recommendation zine, Listen Up!, is a treat. As always, Katie's passion for these shows leaps off the page and her cut-and-paste layout makes it a joy to read. This issue focuses largely on POC-led podcasts and includes a lot of shows that don't often make recommendation lists. Without a doubt, you'll finish reading and want to put one of these shows on...[ continued ]

The companion comics scrapbook to Simon Moreton's epic Minor Leagues series. Prose, comics and photos about being in Japan, making chutney, experiencing autumn.

32 pages, wide quarter-size.

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Comics about being in the snow. Drawings and photos of spring. A fold-out cover with facts about lesser-spotted dogfish. The companion comics scrapbook to Simon Moreton's epic Minor Leagues series. 

40 pages, quarter-size.

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A split zine with one side being dedicated to anecdotal stories of loving Lou Reed (R.I.P.!) in the '70s and the other being about falling in love with the Violent Femmes in 1990. Also within: concert reviews, a giant Violent Femmes crossword, and Favorite Movies About Punx comics.

28 pages, half-letter size.

Temporary sale! Though The Lowbrow Reader makes itself out to be a low-quality bathroom reader it is, in reality, a one-of-a-kind zine that holds some of the wisest and oddest essays about bygone pop culture and its fringes.

In this issue: famed cartoonist Drew Friedman writes about his love for Shemp Howard of the Three Stooges. Fast Times at Ridgemont High/Clueless director Amy Heckerling digs up a private diary...[ continued ]

A heartfelt, compact zine from Jonas (Fixer Eraser, We the Drowned, a million other great zine series). Well worth the dollar (we promise).

24 pages, half-letter size.

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In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to...[ continued ]

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines...[ continued ]

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more...[ continued ]