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Zines

In this, the fifteenth installment of We'll Never Have Paris (the literary zine of all things never meant to be), writers tackle the sprawling mess that is America. 

Essays from Andria Alefhi, Lisa Fenger, Carol Wierzbicki, PF Dumanis, Adrienne Robillard, Sheetal Singh, A.M. Black, and M.P. McCune. Art by Annie Galvin and Gabriel Liston.

48 pages, quarter-size.

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The latest issue of We'll Never Have Paris, the literary zine of all things never meant to be, focuses on food. Within, there are personal essays about diets, the melting pot of culinary cultures in a textiles factory, an immigrant family's relationship to Filet-O-Fish, a French mother's relationship to endives, the morning of Freddy Mercury's death, a failed care package, and more...[ continued ]

After over a decade in Portland, Oregon, Zach and his wife decide to move out before everything that was once good about the city gets sold off to the highest bidder. They decide on Zach's hometown of Rochester, New York and attempt to get their vintage home goods business, animals, and various belongings across the country. (Spoiler: Everything goes wrong.)

The same tragicomedy that Zach brought to his bestselling book Love is Not Constantly Wondering if You're Making the Biggest Mistake of Your Life is in full effect here...[ continued ]

In the vein of his Fixer Eraser zine series, We, the Drowned #2 is Jonas' latest collection of curious short prose pieces. Under the banner of "wishes and ghost stories," the pieces within are filled with conversations, lies, playful tangents, and a lot of heart.

32 pages, quarter-size.

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Mantras, old friends, name-calling, an imagined game. These are some of the odd pleasures of reading the latest batch of stories from Jonas (Fixer Eraser).

24 pages, half-letter size.

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In What Are You Raising Them For?, Tim Devin looks at the counterculture shifts of the '60s and '70s and sees how it changed the way people parented their kids. Using '70s hippie literature and the experiences of adults raised in nontraditional settings as source material, Tim Devin examines where counterculture parenting ideas were coming from, how well they were working, and what we can take away from it all today...[ continued ]

​Last copy! What Happens When You Contain The Flame? is a longform interview with poet/novelist/queer icon Eileen Myles. Discussed within: how to use fame, the positive side of social media, performance and poetry, crossing between worlds and scenes, the legendary Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church, and much more. Myles is, as always, generous, open, and surprising. The zine ends with a lyric essay from poet Hannah Levene...[ continued ]

Seven long-time zinesters talk about what matters (and wasn't doesn't matter) to them. Along the way there are long lost twins, disposable cameras, radio comics, and all the things still left to write. Jonas, Julia Eff, Adam Gnade, Rust Belt Jessie, Jim Joyce, Alex Nall, and Liz Mason.

40 pages, half-letter size.

When Death Knocks is a personal zine written by Death himself. Or, more specifically, written by a lowly "Transition Officer" working for the agency of Death. A morbid and tender piece of writing from the postmortem zine scene. I can say with some certainty that there's nothing else quite like this.

24 pages, quarter-size, cut-and-paste.

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A completely stunning zine celebrating the women of '50s, '60s, and '70s folk music. A nice mix of well-known, recently rediscovered, and lesser-known artists. Biographies and gorgeous pen-and-ink drawings for each artist.

Included within: Vashti Bunyan, Connie Converse, Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, Carolyn Hester, Judee Sill, Judy Collins, Melanie Safka, Margo Guryan, Mary Travers, Karen Dalton, Mimi Farina, Nico, Sibylle Baier, Odetta, and Buffy Sainte-Marie...[ continued ]