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Zines

Though The Lowbrow Reader makes itself out to be a low-quality bathroom reader it is, in reality, a one-of-a-kind zine that holds some of the wisest and oddest essays about bygone pop culture and its fringes.

In this issue: famed cartoonist Drew Friedman writes about his love for Shemp Howard of the Three Stooges. Fast Times at Ridgemont High/Clueless director Amy Heckerling digs up a private diary...[ continued ]

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to...[ continued ]

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines...[ continued ]

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more...[ continued ]

​Last copy! In Masculinities, Cindy Crabb (Doris) explores how we're each individually taught about what masculinity is. The zine focuses on the role models (positive or problematic or often both) who guided that education and how it played out. As she says in her introduction, she wants to "shake [masculinity] up—look at all the varied ways people are taught what it means to be a man, and where they found resistance, examples of other ways to be...[ continued ]

In this issue of the tiniest journal of independent rock and roll: An interview with Rok Lok Records on their 20th anniversary. Plus: record reviews and a short interview with Arcata, California all-ages community space and venue, Outer Space.

8 pages, oblong quarter-size.

An interview with Closer, the new project from Real Life Buildings folks. Lots of album reviews (including our own Sara Renberg's Night Sands!). Every Minimum Rock + Roll issue is a tiny good time.

8 pages, oblong quarter-size.

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Last copy! A travelogue through grief and groceries, far off fields, parks in summer. Oddly singular, this beautifully laid out zine reads like a picture book for daydreamers with complex feelings.

By Bristol comic artist Simon Moreton, author of the Plans We Made graphic novel.

88 pages, oblong A5 size.

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Through minimalist comics and sketches, this issue of Minor Leagues confronts loss while also managing to incorporate playful vignettes and letters from readers. A continually one-of-a-kind zine.

60 pages, half-letter size.

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Dreamy comics about road trips, spreading ashes by the unmanned radar station, covering The Wipers, and getting lost in a bog.

Minor Leagues #4 lets you wander in the dream before coming to at the end with a fold-out sheet that gives the larger story around each real-life comic. 

82 pages, A5 size.

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