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Zines

For the past 17 years, Portland memoirist and illustrator Martha Grover has been publishing Somnambulist zine, an expansive and playful look at the world at large (and easily one of the best zines running today).

This pack includes all nine in-print issues of Somnambulist (a $40 value for $25!). All proceeds go straight to Martha's brain surgery recovery fund...[ continued ]

Some of the world's best zine writers answer the question "Why I get out of bed every morning." The results are beautiful, challenging, and inspiring.

With contributions from: Cindy Crabb (Doris), Tomas Moniz (Rad Dad), Ariel Gore (Hip Mama), Taryn Hipp (SubRosa), Dave Roche (On Subbing), Miss C. Bean, Carrie Colpitts, JC, Norma Krautmeyer, Rebecca Peloquin, Dustin Seelinger, Stacy Russo, and Andréa Sunshine...[ continued ]

"In Starvation Mode, Seattle’s Elissa Washuta—author of 2014’s genre-defying memoir of ethnic identity, sexual trauma, bipolar disorder, and independence, My Body Is a Book of Rules—crafts a personal accounting of her struggle for culinary control, and presents the guidelines she followed as she attempted to shape her body and mind through the food she consumed.

The book’s seemingly simple structure (a series of rules to eat and live by) contrasts with the powerful way she pulls readers into a complicated story of our needs and the cultural pressures that shape us...[ continued ]

A short zine letter about gender, race, identity, and not-knowing from the author of Fixer Eraser and We, the Drowned. 

20 pages, quarter-size.

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Comic artists and comic lovers think about comics and the importance of comics in their lives. (They even draw a few along the way.)

Within: A dusty comic book store in the '80s serving as salvation for a geeky teen girl; dealing with Asperger’s and learning social cues from comics; the current state of Heavy Metal; adapting The Secret Garden; a girl in the 70’s and her love of war comics; superheroes; Harvey Pekar; and much much more...[ continued ]

Ideal Jeopardy boards from 25 contributors (including our own Joshua James Amberson). Taking the idea made popular by Douglas Coupland's Microserfs, A.J. Michel asks us to look at these as a fun "way of summing up a person's quirks descriptively and quickly." The result are lists that are funny, curious, and odd. Look out Ken Jennings.

32 pages, oblong quarter-size, cardstock covers...[ continued ]

Temporary sale! Syndicate Product, one of the all-time great compilation zines, returns with Unrecommended Reading. Ten contributors write about the books that disappointed, angered, or otherwise drove them nuts. Within: Hallmark-level hatred, revolutionary fails, anti-Anne of Green Gables, and the life-changing magic of being okay with your mess.

With words from: Davida Gypsy Breier (Xerography Debt), Jenna Freedman (Before I Forget), Kathy Moseley (Ear Plugs & Ticket Stubs​), Ken Bausert (The Ken Chronicles), Juleigh Howard-Hobson, Samantha M...[ continued ]

Using his real life experiences on and off game shows as the basis for this engrossing collection of essays, Taken for a Ride is part perzine and part pop culture analysis. It's funny, smart, well-written, and totally entertaining throughout.

36 pages, half-letter size.

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Part of Rachel Lee-Carman's continuing series of zines (Show & Tell, Shoe & Tail, Offerings of Grace & Mischief), The Thread is a whirlwind of travels, realizations, dance floors, and sunsets. 

Through hand-written text, photos, comics, and collage, Rachel's zines capture the kind of discovery that zines should embody. Everyday revelations while stumbling, all the highs and lows, figuring it out as you go...[ continued ]

An expert in stirring opposing energies and forces into the same pot, Rachel Lee-Carman's zines are always unlike anything else; an experience all their own. Within: travels to both sidewalk tarot readings and Mom's Bible study group. There's Grandma's tea readings, palm readings, the roots of the word witch, sipping spells, urban herbal harvests, poems in hollowed-out eggs.

Friends contribute, writing about being Native American in a culture that wants to trivialize the customs and forget the people...[ continued ]