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Zines

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more...[ continued ]

A collaboration between Portland nonprofit Know Your City and writer Martha Grover (Somnambulist zine, The End of My Career), The People's Guide to Portland is an in-depth resource guide for marginalized people and communities, as well as a succinct and clear guide to being a good ally. 

Sections within: Chronically Ill/Disabled, Racial Justice, LGBTQIA+, Reproductive Rights, Gender Inequality, Youth, Folks in Recovery, Parenting/Child-Rearing, Survivors of Violent Crime, Survivors of Domestic & Sexual Violence, Housing: Renting and Houselessness, Mental Health, Environmental Justice, Low Income, Educate/Agitate/Organize, Self Care, Veteran Resources, Wealth & Voter Suppression...[ continued ]

A zine pack to highlight the importance (and protect the future) of Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion in the U.S. on January 22nd, 1973.

Included within: A zine about the history of reproductive rights in the U.S. + a speculative fiction chapbook about reproductive rights by Portland writer (and member of the pre-Roe v. Wade JANE underground abortion service) Judith Arcana...[ continued ]

A highly recommended interview issue from this long-running Vancouver, B.C. punk zine. Community organizing, the perspective and challenges of being a DIY lifer, real-life sailing epics. Aaron Cometbus, Shellshag, Matt Hern, and more.
60 pages, half-letter size.

In Snacks in the Park, Portland zine legend Moe Bowstern (Xtra Tuf) meets up with interesting Portlanders in parks around the city. Along the way, there's bits of local history and far-ranging discussions. Casual and fun, but with plenty of depth, Snacks is an interesting ride from cover to cover.

Conversations with: rapper and activist Mic Crenshaw, film-score composers Shawn Parke and Kim Henninger, massage therapist and burlesque performer Shanta Prescott, community radio manager and activist Monica Beemer, furniture maker and salvager Preston Browning, and writer and activist Judith Arcana...[ continued ]

In this issue of Somnambulist, Martha Grover publishes her mom Frani's letters to Portland mayor Ted Wheeler regarding Portland's housing crisis. This far-reaching collection of letters brings in personal, literary, and historical viewpoints. Largely, she writes from her perspective as a long-time advocate for houseless communities. She talks about the friends she's made in these communities over the years and the challenges these friends have faced, trying to get through to the mayor...[ continued ]

Under Pressure: Herbs For Resilience is an in-depth and insightful guide to "twelve plants that can help increase or enhance resilience in times of upheaval and uncertainty." Looking at the physiology of stress, the zine is a holistic guide to surviving in an unhealthy culture.

Written by Janet Kent, an herbalist, writer, and founder of Medicine County Herbs and the Terra Sylva School of Herbal Medicine...[ continued ]

The latest in Jennifer Williams' well-loved workbook zine series. We Need Emotional Labor: Discussion Questions to Redistribute the Work that Holds Communities Together​ is an essential guide to understanding both the value of emotional labor and the imbalance of it.

In her in-depth introduction, Williams asks, "What toxic systems can be uprooted if we start to wipe away the idea that taking care of each other is a burden?" While also pointing out that "There are questions we need to ask, though, before this giving and receiving: Is it consensual? Is it valued? Is it reciprocal?" (Clementine Morrigan...[ continued ]