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Zines

In Caboose #10, zine limunary Liz Mason explores the world of transcendental meditation. The zine is an adventure through her discovery process, taking her into nondescript offices and tiny rooms full of fruit and hankies. Also within: TM memoirs, informational videos, Cutco knives, Dale Carnegie, Skinny Puppy, Jerry Seinfeld, the Maharishi, and David Lynch.

24 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

A braided essay about losing a parent and losing a pet. The odd lessons that loss teaches. The practical ways we make room for grief. A sad and sweet issue of the long-running Caboose zine. 

20 pages, half-letter size.

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Under the banner of "lost and found," this issue of the Cat Party zine has comics, essays, and illustrations from Rebecca Bayuk, Kelsey Stewart, Dino Caruso, Marylyn Martin-Weatherly, Adam Wollett, Joseph Carlough, and Eden Shale.

32 pages, half-letter size.

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The Seattle zine Clock Tower Nine is a perfect assortment of oddities. Pinball history, Cleveland novelty shirts, postcard lessons, jukebox stories. All I can say is I want every issue from here on out.

20 pages, half-letter size.

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Clock Tower Nine has become one of my new favorite zines. Using a variety-format approach reminiscent of classic '90s zines, Danny Noonan puts together a consistently interesting assortment. Letters, postcards, and the stories of others mix with personal narratives, odd facts, and ephemera.

This issue largely consists of a story about being a roadie for a band, an intercontinental fast friendship through postcards and drunk dials, and a barely-planned cross-country road trip...[ continued ]

In an attempt to figure out the last record he would ever sell, Danny Noonan writes the story of a skittish teenager’s discovery of punk that leads him to house shows and eventually a move across the country. It’s a celebration of record stores that spans 25 years and explores the anxiety of youth, the community of punk, and how much it sucks not to be able to find a job when you need it the most...[ continued ]

Cometbus #55 could be looked at two ways: A treatise on growing up without giving up, or proof that even the most dedicated proponent of youth culture grows old. Either way, it’s fascinating. It’s coming from a life in punk, leftist politics, and DIY culture, but you don’t need to be interested in any of that to be interested in the stories he tells.

72 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

With the hyperbolic zeal and rancor of a true bookseller, Aaron Cometbus brings to life his chosen family: the booksellers of New York City. A Bestiary of Booksellers is for anyone who has sold books long enough to have it seep into their identity, but it’s also for all manner of book addicts, subculture scholars, obsessives, and night owls.

112 pages, half-letter size, perfect-bound...[ continued ]

Last copy! Intricately restaging images from the '40s, '50s and '60s and using herself and her friends as models, artist Lenae Day creates some of the most brilliant and strange pieces of art. Blurring the lines between social commentary, absurdity, memoir, humor, and art, Day Magazine is sure to entertain and confuse. Highly recommended.

Magazine size, color and black & white images, 16 pages...[ continued ]

Doris #30 is full of so many treasures: capturing a swarm of bees, finding community in new places, telling tour stories, forming study groups, and so much more. In it's longest and most vital piece, Cindy interviews sexual abuse survivors and meditates on how to think differently about accountability processes.

32 pages, half-legal size.

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