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Zines

One of our favorite Seattle zines is back with tales from the record store counter, long walks in various locales, dangerous doppelgängers, and 8-track tapes. 

As Clock Tower Nine ringleader Danny Noonan describes it in the introduction: "This fanzine is like a bunch of people sitting around a fire in late fall, all taking turns telling a story."

24 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

Last copy! This wonderfully unique collection features essays from game show winners, losers, writers, producers, and fans. This interesting assortment of unlikely zinesters spans a huge range of ages and backgrounds. The result is a fascinating and hilarious read that also functions as an informal sociological analysis of the long-running, and completely odd, cultural phenomenon of game shows...[ continued ]

Cometbus #55 could be looked at two ways: A treatise on growing up without giving up, or proof that even the most dedicated proponent of youth culture grows old. Either way, it’s fascinating. It’s coming from a life in punk, leftist politics, and DIY culture, but you don’t need to be interested in any of that to be interested in the stories he tells.

72 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

With the hyperbolic zeal and rancor of a true bookseller, Aaron Cometbus brings to life his chosen family: the booksellers of New York City. A Bestiary of Booksellers is for anyone who has sold books long enough to have it seep into their identity, but it’s also for all manner of book addicts, subculture scholars, obsessives, and night owls.

112 pages, half-letter size, perfect-bound...[ continued ]

How does Cometbus, after 38 years as a zine, just get better and better? It's a mystery, but it does. Issue 59 is a deep dive into both death and longevity in the underground. In short: what does sustainability look like in counterculture? This question takes Aaron on a journey from the Epitaph Records and Thrasher magazine offices to hanging out at a punk-owned vegan donut shop and a tamale stand at the farmer's market with Allison Wolfe (of Bratmobile and Sex Stains fame)...[ continued ]

In Delicate Pipes, Erin Dorney (I Am Not Famous Anymore) creates a distilled personal history of digestive issues. Coming at the material from a variety of different approaches and interspersing collage work, Delicate Pipes is part personal zine, part art object.

20 pages, quarter-size, full-color.

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A back-issue fave from one of the best zines ever. Long personal stories that look both outward and inward in surprising ways. The opening piece on love is possibly one of the best Doris moments, going through the many different kinds of love, the ways it can look and the ways it can change us.

36 pages, half-letter size.

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Another favorite back issue of Doris. Shy-punk-girl comics, social ecology, the cynical hour, a grandpa who built malls, hammer and nail history, and more.

24 pages, half-letter size.

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Doris #30 is full of so many treasures: capturing a swarm of bees, finding community in new places, telling tour stories, forming study groups, and so much more. In it's longest and most vital piece, Cindy interviews sexual abuse survivors and meditates on how to think differently about accountability processes.

32 pages, half-legal size.

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Doris #31 is largely built on one long piece about squatting an empty beach house in Cape Cod one off-season long ago, and all the things the experience taught. But there's also: Watching baby lambs being born. What reparations can mean and look like. Good books. 

20 pages, half-letter size.

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