updating cart, please wait...
Zines

A fun issue of Somnambulist that looks at the Pacific Northwest regional chain grocery store, Fred Meyer. Bizarre tales and fun facts from the store that invented one-stop shopping. Pregnancy tests, Leonardo DiCaprio, and our love-hate relationships with the places where we shop.

24 pages, half-letter size.

[ continued ]

In this issue of Somnambulist, Martha Grover publishes her mom Frani's letters to Portland mayor Ted Wheeler regarding Portland's housing crisis. This far-reaching collection of letters brings in personal, literary, and historical viewpoints. Largely, she writes from her perspective as a long-time advocate for houseless communities. She talks about the friends she's made in these communities over the years and the challenges these friends have faced, trying to get through to the mayor...[ continued ]

Part of Rachel Lee-Carman's continuing series of zines (Show & Tell, Shoe & Tail, Offerings of Grace & Mischief), The Thread is a whirlwind of travels, realizations, dance floors, and sunsets. 

Through hand-written text, photos, comics, and collage, Rachel's zines capture the kind of discovery that zines should embody. Everyday revelations while stumbling, all the highs and lows, figuring it out as you go...[ continued ]

An expert in stirring opposing energies and forces into the same pot, Rachel Lee-Carman's zines are always unlike anything else; an experience all their own. Within: travels to both sidewalk tarot readings and Mom's Bible study group. There's Grandma's tea readings, palm readings, the roots of the word witch, sipping spells, urban herbal harvests, poems in hollowed-out eggs.

Friends contribute, writing about being Native American in a culture that wants to trivialize the customs and forget the people...[ continued ]

A new Portland poetry zine/literary journal that's surely bound for greatness. In this, the first issue, there's poetry from: Carl Adamshick (author of Saint Friend), Ross Robbins, Aimee Lopez, John Koch, David Midkiff, Heidi Elise Sellick, Yin-Lai Brenda Chung, Jessica Moore, Majesty Snowbird, Jake Ayres, John Alkek, Ariel D'Souza, Kristen Rian, and Rodney Koeneke. Plus an essay on the poetry of Jim Jarmusch's Paterson...[ continued ]

The latest (and most gorgeous yet) from Portland literary zine, Windowcat. Playful, daring, varied, and so so good.

With work from: Amie Zimmerman, Dan Raphael, Emily Garcia, Andew Haley, Tracy Pitts, Ditta Baron Hoeber, Mary Hashimoto, Bart King, Ross Robbins, Aimee Lopez, Joshua James Amberson, Jake Ayres, and Jessica Moore.

40 pages, half-letter size, hand-sewn binding, letter-pressed covers...[ continued ]

Temporary sale! The second issue of the Portland poetry zine Windowcat, "an ongoing collection of words dedicated to furthering the reach of poetry and spreading the infinite variations of language-play that can exist." 

Includes work from: Hadas Moalem, Jamie Zerndt, Aubrey Gates King, Matt Schumacher, George Ayres, Miranda Hubbard, Heather Alexander, Dylan Stringer, Erik Olson, Adam Alexander, Anna O'Connor, Hanna Litwinowick, and a hot hot series of poems from Sam Lohmann of the great Peaches & Bats literary zine...[ continued ]

An illustrated introduction to women artists, feminist art, and the problems of the visual art canon. By Portland artist M. Sabine Rear. A great read and an essential addition to any zine collection. Highly recommended!

Within: Louise Bourgeois, Carrie Mae Weems, Eva Hesse, Yoko Ono, Ana Mendieta, Alice Neel, Hannah Wilke, Rosa Bonheur, Méret Oppenheim, Gabriele Münter, Mary Kelly, Rokudenashiko, Hannah Höch, Shirin Neshat, Lee Krasner, Catherine Opie, Louise Nevelson, Orlan, Lorna Simpson, Andrea Fraser, Helen Frankenthaler, Nan Goldin, Vaginal Creme Davis, and the Guerilla Girls...[ continued ]

The new issue of the decade-long-running (!) Women of Color Zine. Written as a special edition for this year's Portland Zine Symposium, this issue is full of great pieces. 

Within: From the perspective of a picture book author and librarian, Cathy Camper writes about place as an aspect of representation in children's publishing. Antoinette writes about the process of shedding the shame around mental health issues...[ continued ]