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Zines

Comic artists and comic lovers think about comics and the importance of comics in their lives. (They even draw a few along the way.)

Within: A dusty comic book store in the '80s serving as salvation for a geeky teen girl; dealing with Asperger’s and learning social cues from comics; the current state of Heavy Metal; adapting The Secret Garden; a girl in the 70’s and her love of war comics; superheroes; Harvey Pekar; and much much more...[ continued ]

Part of Rachel Lee-Carman's continuing series of zines (Show & Tell, Shoe & Tail, Offerings of Grace & Mischief), The Thread is a whirlwind of travels, realizations, dance floors, and sunsets. 

Through hand-written text, photos, comics, and collage, Rachel's zines capture the kind of discovery that zines should embody. Everyday revelations while stumbling, all the highs and lows, figuring it out as you go...[ continued ]

An expert in stirring opposing energies and forces into the same pot, Rachel Lee-Carman's zines are always unlike anything else; an experience all their own. Within: travels to both sidewalk tarot readings and Mom's Bible study group. There's Grandma's tea readings, palm readings, the roots of the word witch, sipping spells, urban herbal harvests, poems in hollowed-out eggs.

Friends contribute, writing about being Native American in a culture that wants to trivialize the customs and forget the people...[ continued ]

Last copy! Marked down due to minor assembling errors. The new issue of one of the all-time best zines. In a series of letters, written over the course of two years teaching in Chicago Public Schools, LB thinks about how to cope when everything feels so hopeless. Looking at systems of power in many forms—the perpetuation of sexual violence against women, the disregard of low-income students of color—LB tries to make sense of the onslaught of awful they deal with every day...[ continued ]

The new issue of Alyssa Giannini's gorgeously illustrated personal zine, Wanderer. Within: road trips, house shows, gender identity, zine mazes, and odes to initiators of fun. As well as finding ways through depression and panic attacks and hard times.

My favorite piece is on platonic intimacy. Alyssa writes, "Friendship is so often undervalued in favor of romantic coupling. I say let's share longer hugs and learn to be vulnerable with friends and not just lovers...[ continued ]

Seven long-time zinesters talk about what matters (and wasn't doesn't matter) to them. Along the way there are long lost twins, disposable cameras, radio comics, and all the things still left to write. Jonas, Julia Eff, Adam Gnade, Rust Belt Jessie, Jim Joyce, Alex Nall, and Liz Mason.

40 pages, half-letter size.

A completely stunning zine celebrating the women of '50s, '60s, and '70s folk music. A nice mix of well-known, recently rediscovered, and lesser-known artists. Biographies and gorgeous pen-and-ink drawings for each artist.

Included within: Vashti Bunyan, Connie Converse, Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, Carolyn Hester, Judee Sill, Judy Collins, Melanie Safka, Margo Guryan, Mary Travers, Karen Dalton, Mimi Farina, Nico, Sibylle Baier, Odetta, and Buffy Sainte-Marie...[ continued ]

An illustrated introduction to women artists, feminist art, and the problems of the visual art canon. By Portland artist M. Sabine Rear. A great read and an essential addition to any zine collection. Highly recommended!

Within: Louise Bourgeois, Carrie Mae Weems, Eva Hesse, Yoko Ono, Ana Mendieta, Alice Neel, Hannah Wilke, Rosa Bonheur, Méret Oppenheim, Gabriele Münter, Mary Kelly, Rokudenashiko, Hannah Höch, Shirin Neshat, Lee Krasner, Catherine Opie, Louise Nevelson, Orlan, Lorna Simpson, Andrea Fraser, Helen Frankenthaler, Nan Goldin, Vaginal Creme Davis, and the Guerilla Girls...[ continued ]

The new issue of the decade-long-running (!) Women of Color Zine. Written as a special edition for this year's Portland Zine Symposium, this issue is full of great pieces. 

Within: From the perspective of a picture book author and librarian, Cathy Camper writes about place as an aspect of representation in children's publishing. Antoinette writes about the process of shedding the shame around mental health issues...[ continued ]