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Zines

Keesha and Joanie and Jane is a fictional story where, in a not-too-distant future, abortion is made illegal in the United States. Young women inspired by the work of Jane, the Chicago pre-Roe v Wade underground abortion service, get a grant to bring the original "Janes" to town to speak at their school as an excuse to talk out how to make their own underground abortion service.

Written by Portland author Judith Arcana —one of the original Janes —and brilliantly formatted like a Broadway Playbill by Eberhardt Press...[ continued ]

A thoughtful zine that asks artists to reexamine how they use Facebook and how Facebook uses them. Not a call to boycott the platform entirely, but to simply think deeply about it and seek solutions beyond it. Written by Paul DeGeorge of Harry & The Potters.

As he so wisely writes in the introduction, Keep Content Off Facebook hopes to give "creative communities a starting point for more closely examining their relationship with Facebook...[ continued ]

In the first issue of Keep Loving, Keep Fighting in ten years (!!!), Hope gives us an art object. Combining short, poetic lines about loss, grief, and spirituality with full-color spreads of transcendent mixed-media art, this is a zine to hold close.

32 pages, half-letter size. Full-color, rubberband binding, letter-pressed covers.

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Know Your Vote, a workbook zine from Anna Jo Beck, seeks to help you make sense of the United States voting system and political structures. Prompting you to figure out your state's elections, representatives, and local government, this zine is a much-needed guide for anyone left confused by the (often ridiculously complex) American systems of democracy. 

From Beck's Biff Boff Bam Sock zine series...[ continued ]

The Kytchyn Witche is a guide to using simple, natural ingredients for your body and home. It's a straightforward zine that helps you look at household products differently and gives simple recipes for making your own household cleaners and body care creations.

Balms, essential oil steams, infusions, growing/harvesting/preserving herbs, and much more.

24 pages, half-letter size, sewn binding...[ continued ]

In this, the first issue of Last Night at the Casino, Billy gives us a glimpse at casino life from the eyes of a newbie dealer. His love of oddballs and openness to just about any kind of situation makes him the perfect host for this adventure. Fun, just a touch heartbreaking, and a great sociological study on a subject I’ve never seen any other zine take on.

32 pages, quarter-size...[ continued ]

Mini story-essays about tigers, Henri Rousseau, Yelp as a personal blog, Jorge Luis Borges, freight elevator rides, landlords with enemies, and more.

32 pages, quarter-size.

An epistolary zine from Jonas (Fixer Eraser) and Julia Eff about mortality and carrying on in the face of serious health and mental health issues. Raw, real, and filled with ghosts.

32 pages, quarter-size.

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Though The Lowbrow Reader makes itself out to be a low-quality bathroom reader it is, in reality, a one-of-a-kind zine that holds some of the wisest and oddest essays about bygone pop culture and its fringes.

In this issue: famed cartoonist Drew Friedman writes about his love for Shemp Howard of the Three Stooges. Fast Times at Ridgemont High/Clueless director Amy Heckerling digs up a private diary...[ continued ]

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to...[ continued ]