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Zines

A fun issue of Somnambulist that looks at the Pacific Northwest regional chain grocery store, Fred Meyer. Bizarre tales and fun facts from the store that invented one-stop shopping. Pregnancy tests, Leonardo DiCaprio, and our love-hate relationships with the places where we shop.

24 pages, half-letter size.

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In this issue of Somnambulist, Martha Grover publishes her mom Frani's letters to Portland mayor Ted Wheeler regarding Portland's housing crisis. This far-reaching collection of letters brings in personal, literary, and historical viewpoints. Largely, she writes from her perspective as a long-time advocate for houseless communities. She talks about the friends she's made in these communities over the years and the challenges these friends have faced, trying to get through to the mayor...[ continued ]

A short lyric essay about facts, Texas, old friends, Olympia. Done up nicely in an old-school cut-and-paste collage style.

12 pages, half-letter size.

Some of the world's best zine writers answer the question "Why I get out of bed every morning." The results are beautiful, challenging, and inspiring.

With contributions from: Cindy Crabb (Doris), Tomas Moniz (Rad Dad), Ariel Gore (Hip Mama), Taryn Hipp (SubRosa), Dave Roche (On Subbing), Miss C. Bean, Carrie Colpitts, JC, Norma Krautmeyer, Rebecca Peloquin, Dustin Seelinger, Stacy Russo, and Andréa Sunshine...[ continued ]

Last copy! Short essays on what it takes to get out of bed in the morning. Words by Alice Bag, Alex Wrekk, Joshua James Amberson, Jim Joyce, Kelli Callis, Jenna Freedman, Art Noose, Jami Sailor, Emma Karin Eriksson, Nyxia Grey, Jennie Hinchcliff, Matthew Moyer, Kendy Paxia, and Aaron Weber.

60 pages, helf-letter size. Cover colors vary.

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Comic artists and comic lovers think about comics and the importance of comics in their lives. (They even draw a few along the way.)

Within: A dusty comic book store in the '80s serving as salvation for a geeky teen girl; dealing with Asperger’s and learning social cues from comics; the current state of Heavy Metal; adapting The Secret Garden; a girl in the 70’s and her love of war comics; superheroes; Harvey Pekar; and much much more...[ continued ]

Ideal Jeopardy boards from 25 contributors (including our own Joshua James Amberson). Taking the idea made popular by Douglas Coupland's Microserfs, A.J. Michel asks us to look at these as a fun "way of summing up a person's quirks descriptively and quickly." The result are lists that are funny, curious, and odd. Look out Ken Jennings.

32 pages, oblong quarter-size, cardstock covers...[ continued ]

Syndicate Product, one of the all-time great compilation zines, returns with Unrecommended Reading. Ten contributors write about the books that disappointed, angered, or otherwise drove them nuts. Within: Hallmark-level hatred, revolutionary fails, anti-Anne of Green Gables, and the life-changing magic of being okay with your mess.

With words from: Davida Gypsy Breier (Xerography Debt), Jenna Freedman (Before I Forget), Kathy Moseley (Ear Plugs & Ticket Stubs​), Ken Bausert (The Ken Chronicles), Juleigh Howard-Hobson, Samantha M...[ continued ]

Part of Rachel Lee-Carman's continuing series of zines (Show & Tell, Shoe & Tail, Offerings of Grace & Mischief), The Thread is a whirlwind of travels, realizations, dance floors, and sunsets. 

Through hand-written text, photos, comics, and collage, Rachel's zines capture the kind of discovery that zines should embody. Everyday revelations while stumbling, all the highs and lows, figuring it out as you go...[ continued ]

An expert in stirring opposing energies and forces into the same pot, Rachel Lee-Carman's zines are always unlike anything else; an experience all their own. Within: travels to both sidewalk tarot readings and Mom's Bible study group. There's Grandma's tea readings, palm readings, the roots of the word witch, sipping spells, urban herbal harvests, poems in hollowed-out eggs.

Friends contribute, writing about being Native American in a culture that wants to trivialize the customs and forget the people...[ continued ]