Zines

Nearly thirty years into its existence, 8-Track Mind still manages a weirdness few other zines have. Loosely dedicated to an obsession with 8-track tapes, in issue 104, the "Cartridge Family" ostensibly work under the theme of "the commodification of nostalgia" and let whatever happens happen. 

Within: a series of oddball fables, 8-track Terminator, a Muskegon Eight-Track story, So Wrong They're Right, the scam of 8-track eBay, and so much more. With contributions from: Ralph Coon, Brendan DeVallance, Liam Hayes, Malcolm Riviera, Dan Sutherland, and Lucien Williams.

As editor Russ Forster writes, "I have always endeavored to make 8-Track Mind Magazine a bastion of individual expression, be it nostalgic or otherwise. Perhaps this has always been the true quest for the magazine: to encourage a contrarian, individualistic experience of the spoils of consumer society as a way to resist being a tool for the amoral beneficiaries of consumerism."

Comes with a full-color 8-track centerfold. 40 pages, half-letter size. 

 

JB Antonia $5.00

A rare, almost-sublime zine about place, memory, and lost history. About the ways things change and stay the same. About how the place you're from shapes who you become. About growing up in a small Midwestern town without a zip code, a place not on most maps. 

As JB writes in the introduction: "I never read about or saw anything that looked like where I grew up. I was always on the lookout, but depictions of rural areas I encountered didn't feel familiar, seemed to picture a world that was too remote, too friendly, too simple, too impoverished, too sinister, or too romantic...This is an attempt to capture was I know, what I've learned, and what I remember about Antonia." HIGHLY recommended!

48 pages, half-letter size, cover colors vary.

A zine in tribute to a maligned beauty of pop culture's past: the compact cassette tape. Twenty writers, musicians, DJs, label owners, publishers, and comic artists tell stories of how cassette tapes have affected their lives, for better or worse. 

Within: the art of the mixtape, the importance of the boombox, the intimacy of the Walkman. Plus tales of recording with cassettes, performing with cassettes, releasing cassettes, falling in love with cassettes. Nostalgia, subversion, frustration, possibility.

Contributions from: Andrew Barton, Ariel Birks, Karleigh Frisbie Brogan, Aaron Burch, Laura Daegling, Tim Devin, Fukumup, Aaron Gilbreath, Cynthia Carmina Gómez, Jack Lewis, Chask'e Lindgren, Pat Maley, Jason Martin, Sara Renberg, Kevin Sampsell, Gina Sarti, Christopher Sutton, Tucker Theodore, and Alexis Wolf.

Cover art by Rachel Lee-Carman. Risograph-printed throughout by Whatnow Press. 60 pages, half-letter size. 

In this issue of Brainscan, Alex Wrekk (Stolen Sharpie Revolution) discusses the individualized witchcraft practice she's pieced together over the past decade. While documenting her journey, she looks at a variety of other witchcraft traditions, why they didn't fully work for her, and why secular witchcraft is just as valid as any other form. She also gives plenty of history and context to help understand terms that often get lumped together (Wicca, Pagan, etc), and critiques the cultural appropriation and consumerism that often arise in modern witchcraft manifestations.

The zine can also serve as a how-to guide to building your own practice. She encourages readers who are interested to figure out their own path, and to simply view her story as inspiration to seek something that works for them.

64 pages, quarter legal-sized. Vellum overlays, cardstock cover, and hand-stitched binding with acorn pendants. Illustrations by Steve Larder.

Long-time zinester Liz Mason and her husband Joe Mason take on the subject of secret societies ("Masons on Masons.") Highly informative and incredibly cheeky histories of the Masons, the Illuminati, and more.

48 pages, half-letter size.

An adorable little zine about a some great cats of history. Cats immortalized in poems, cats who braved trans-Antarctic explorations, cats famous for watching cricket. A perfect gift for any literary cat lover.

16 pages, cut quarter-size. Cover colors vary.

A history of pre-Roe v Wade America, underground abortion services, and the pro-choice movement. Packed with stories of incredible women who took matters into their own hands.

24 pages, A5 size.

Last two copies! The second issue of the excellent movies of the 1930s zine, A Great and Terrible Golden Age. Within: a Joan Crawford rich person solo sport montage, Soviet sci-fi, the pompous genius of "the fifth Marx Brother" Margaret Dumont, Greta Garbo's only rom-com, and Ernst Lubitsch galore!

Contributions from Emily Alden Foster, Bethany Simard, Yvonne Li, Emily Parrish, Lindsey Simard, Robert Dynamite, Tessa Brunton, and Joshua James Amberson.

56 pages, quarter-size.

A Handy Guide to Home Protection is a short guide to cleansing unwanted energy from your home. Suggested herbs, trees, and minerals, along with their histories, mythologies, and methods of use.

A gorgeous, accessible zine from Moe Bowstern of Xtra Tuf.

12 pages, half-legal size.

Keesha and Joanie and Jane is a fictional story where, in a not-too-distant future, abortion is made illegal in the United States. Young women inspired by the work of Jane, the Chicago pre-Roe v Wade underground abortion service, get a grant to bring the original "Janes" to town to speak at their school as an excuse to talk out how to make their own underground abortion service.

Written by Portland author Judith Arcana —one of the original Janes —and brilliantly formatted like a Broadway Playbill by Eberhardt Press. The story is followed by an excellent Q+A with author Judith Arcana at the end of the chapbook.

64 pages, A5 size, full color.