Zines

A Handy Guide to Home Protection is a short guide to cleansing unwanted energy from your home. Suggested herbs, trees, and minerals, along with their histories, mythologies, and methods of use.

A gorgeous, accessible zine from Moe Bowstern of Xtra Tuf.

12 pages, half-legal size.

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This DIY punk venue history is more than just an archive of the 21st-century Boston punk scene (though it is, very much, that), but also a brief history of DIY venues in general. Tracking the beginnings of the anti-corporate punk spirit of the late '70s and early '80s, to the "no stage" ethos of the early '90s, to the house show culture of the 2000s, this zine is for anyone interested in DIY culture...[ continued ]

Keesha and Joanie and Jane is a fictional story where, in a not-too-distant future, abortion is made illegal in the United States. Young women inspired by the work of Jane, the Chicago pre-Roe v Wade underground abortion service, get a grant to bring the original "Janes" to town to speak at their school as an excuse to talk out how to make their own underground abortion service.

Written by Portland author Judith Arcana —one of the original Janes —and brilliantly formatted like a Broadway Playbill by Eberhardt Press...[ continued ]

Cut pages, a touch of Choose Your Own Adventure, Pablo Neruda, drawings, the spirit world, and more. Like no other zine.

32 pages, mini quarter-size.

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to...[ continued ]

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines...[ continued ]

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more...[ continued ]

Simple and practical suggestions to help you get your words onto the page. Straightforward, laid out nicely, and accessible to everyone.

Also included within: a fun abridged history of writing and communication tools.

28 pages, half-letter size, cover colors vary.

Leave it to PonyBoy Press to write a concise history of everything you ever wanted to know about I Love Lucy. Early TV history, the many ways the show was ahead of its time, and all the dirt behind the first hugely successful American sitcom.

Profiles on Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, William Frawley, and (of course) Lucille Ball. Plus the best episodes, eras of the show, the bad parts, song lyrics, recommended viewing, and a reading list...[ continued ]

Krissy Ponyboy chronicles her decades-long obsession with Beat Generation writers, and the obsession's gradual decline. Like all issues of Paper Crush, Dumping Kerouac is awesome, straightforward, and wise.

24 pages, quarter-size.

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