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Zines

Last copy! This issue of 8-Track Mind comes after a ten-year (!) hiatus and is by far one of the best zines I’ve read in a long time. No longer purely an 8-track fanzine, it is now a look at the future of paper media and analog technologies in the digital present.

Editor Russ Forster asks 14 people who have been creating for long enough to be considered legends (from filmmakers to authors, magazine publishers to members of punk bands) the simple question “zines vs...[ continued ]

(Last two copies!) 8-Track Mind is back again and this time it has come to celebrate the analog resurgence. Wildly different pieces spanning a whole range of voices and opinions, with extra commentary from some legends of underground media and music.

8TM never fails to disappoint and has the ability to make you think about something as seemingly simple as music formats as something expansive, something that carries over into other aspects of life...[ continued ]

Nearly thirty years into its existence, 8-Track Mind still manages a weirdness few other zines have. Loosely dedicated to an obsession with 8-track tapes, in issue 104, the "Cartridge Family" ostensibly work under the theme of "the commodification of nostalgia" and let whatever happens happen. 

Within: a series of oddball fables, 8-track Terminator, a Muskegon Eight-Track story, So Wrong They're Right, the scam of 8-track eBay, and so much more...[ continued ]

Jennifer Williams' latest workbook zine, The Actual Feeling: Discussion Questions to Name Emotions and Ask for the Support You Need, helps lead readers to the core of their emotional needs. Created out of workshops she led in the wake of the Ghost Ship tragedy and the 2016 election, The Actual Feeling asks its readers to define words in tangible ways in order to better communicate needs and better support others...[ continued ]

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. She asks us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes...[ continued ]

Part music magazine, part art zine, and part literary journal, Antsy is a notably pleasurable combination of things brought to you by a star-studded cast. Within: editor Dustin Krcatovich interviews street-performer legend The Space Lady and experimental filmmaker Ben Russell. Pop songwriting genius Fred Thomas interviews ambient musician Dominic Coppola. Forest Juziuk brings us into the making of the classic surf-rock novelty record The Ventures in Space...[ continued ]

From one of the modern masters of the sentence comes this handsome pocket-sized chapbook of four gloriously oddball short stories.

"Beautifully printed by our friends at Scout Books, Lutz’s new fictions dig deeper into the psyche of men and women grappling with making sense of their aging bodies and frantic but tired hearts, often living in towns where 'all roads led to the one road that wasn’t going where you wanted to go...[ continued ]

The first issue of Fred Thomas' Balcony, a highly enjoyable take on the now-rare music-focused variety zine. Balcony is a joy. The brilliant opening essay (on the naming of zines and bands and season three of Jersey Shore) brought me back to a golden era of zines that I often long for, and the rest of the zine stays on this bright path with a short history of post-punk, a list, and an interview with sound artist Andrea Pensado...[ continued ]

In this issue of Balcony there's a public apology, an essay about Lewis Hyde's The Gift, an interview with left-field hip-hop musician Sterling Toles, in-depth record reviews, and a couple poems by Charles Gonsalves. But as in every issue of Balcony, it's also much more than that. A surprising, quietly exceptional zine.

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

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"A funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done." So begins the third issue of Balcony, the publishing outlet of musician Fred Thomas (Saturday Looks Good to Me, City Center).

Interviews with long-running New Zealand experimental rock band The Dead C, cultish songwriter Edith Frost, and ambient musician John Daniel of Forest Management...[ continued ]