Zines

Nearly thirty years into its existence, 8-Track Mind still manages a weirdness few other zines have. Loosely dedicated to an obsession with 8-track tapes, in issue 104, the "Cartridge Family" ostensibly work under the theme of "the commodification of nostalgia" and let whatever happens happen. 

Within: a series of oddball fables, 8-track Terminator, a Muskegon Eight-Track story, So Wrong They're Right, the scam of 8-track eBay, and so much more. With contributions from: Ralph Coon, Brendan DeVallance, Liam Hayes, Malcolm Riviera, Dan Sutherland, and Lucien Williams.

As editor Russ Forster writes, "I have always endeavored to make 8-Track Mind Magazine a bastion of individual expression, be it nostalgic or otherwise. Perhaps this has always been the true quest for the magazine: to encourage a contrarian, individualistic experience of the spoils of consumer society as a way to resist being a tool for the amoral beneficiaries of consumerism."

Comes with a full-color 8-track centerfold. 40 pages, half-letter size. 

 

A sweet personal zine about all the people in Frederick Moe's life that have stepped in as a father when he needed one. Talking about his work in mental health care and disability rights along the way.

12 pages, half-letter size.

Awesome Things is just that: a collection of things that are awesome. Long-time zine superstar Liz Mason's lists are playful and idiosyncratic.

32 pages, quarter-size.

From "tattoos of office supplies" to "using dollhouses as bookshelves" and everything odd and nuanced from the daily life of Liz Mason.

28 pages, quarter-size.

In this issue of Balcony there's a public apology, an essay about Lewis Hyde's The Gift, an interview with left-field hip-hop musician Sterling Toles, in-depth record reviews, and a couple poems by Charles Gonsalves. But as in every issue of Balcony, it's also much more than that. A surprising, quietly exceptional zine.

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

"A funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done." So begins the third issue of Balcony, the publishing outlet of musician Fred Thomas (Saturday Looks Good to Me, City Center).

Interviews with long-running New Zealand experimental rock band The Dead C, cultish songwriter Edith Frost, and ambient musician John Daniel of Forest Management. Plus a piece about names from Marcy Donelson. 

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

Short essays about trying to make a living from writing words. Comic nightmares from the world of freelance writing, night school, weekly papers, and cities of books.

Paper airplane examples throughout. 32 pages, cut half-letter size.

This issue of the long-running Basic Paper Airplane zine series focuses on interviews—what it means to create that space and all the ways they can succeed or fail. Ten interviews with writers, artists, and musicians that delve into the creative process, identity, family, image, myth, and obsession.

Interviews with: musician Owen Ashworth (Advance Base/Casiotone for the Painfully Alone), essayist Elena Passarello (Animals Strike Curious Poses), poet Casey Fuller (A Fort Made of Doors), musician Erika M. Anderson (EMA), filmmaker/installation artist Vanessa Renwick, musician Karl Blau, children's book writer/illustrator Kate Berube (Hannah and Sugar), writer/musician/multimedia artist Dao Strom (We Were Meant to be a Gentle People), poet A.M. O'Malley (Expecting Something Else), and oral historian Audrey Petty (High Rise Stories).

40 pages, half-letter size. Risograph covers by C. Stone and Anthony Michael at Montavilla Press.

A zine in tribute to a maligned beauty of pop culture's past: the compact cassette tape. Twenty writers, musicians, DJs, label owners, publishers, and comic artists tell stories of how cassette tapes have affected their lives, for better or worse. 

Within: the art of the mixtape, the importance of the boombox, the intimacy of the Walkman. Plus tales of recording with cassettes, performing with cassettes, releasing cassettes, falling in love with cassettes. Nostalgia, subversion, frustration, possibility.

Contributions from: Andrew Barton, Ariel Birks, Karleigh Frisbie Brogan, Aaron Burch, Laura Daegling, Tim Devin, Fukumup, Aaron Gilbreath, Cynthia Carmina Gómez, Jack Lewis, Chask'e Lindgren, Pat Maley, Jason Martin, Sara Renberg, Kevin Sampsell, Gina Sarti, Christopher Sutton, Tucker Theodore, and Alexis Wolf.

Cover art by Rachel Lee-Carman. Risograph-printed throughout by Whatnow Press. 60 pages, half-letter size. 

Last copy! The first issue of Behind the Wheel is one of those instant zine classics that only come along every so often. Kelly Dessaint becomes a Lyft driver in a rapidly changing San Francisco and chaos ensues. Dessaint, an old-school zine curmudgeon of the highest order, is the perfect guide for this journey—never bought in, ever out of place, always questioning. 

Within: learning the ropes, techwads, cops, required fist bumps, class war.

60 pages, half-letter size. Complete with maps and photos and Lyft feedback. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series.