Zines

In this issue of Brainscan, Alex Wrekk (Stolen Sharpie Revolution) discusses the individualized witchcraft practice she's pieced together over the past decade. While documenting her journey, she looks at a variety of other witchcraft traditions, why they didn't fully work for her, and why secular witchcraft is just as valid as any other form. She also gives plenty of history and context to help understand terms that often get lumped together (Wicca, Pagan, etc), and critiques the cultural appropriation and consumerism that often arise in modern witchcraft manifestations.

The zine can also serve as a how-to guide to building your own practice. She encourages readers who are interested to figure out their own path, and to simply view her story as inspiration to seek something that works for them.

64 pages, quarter legal-sized. Vellum overlays, cardstock cover, and hand-stitched binding with acorn pendants. Illustrations by Steve Larder.

In the wake of the controversy surrounding a recent viral article about spending a week "becoming a witch," Alex considers what her guide to a witchcraft practice would look like. The results are a day-by-day guide to trying out her particular variety of secular witchcraft (that she lovingly refers to as "DIY witchery").

Within: cleaning-as-cleansing, everyday altars, grounding and centering, perception and animism, correspondences, sigils, spells, divination, and more. An open and accessible zine that thinks about witchcraft in a way not often presented in print. 

52 pages, quarter-size.

Temporary sale! In her short illustrated essay A Few Good Boys, M. Sabine Rear writes about growing up surrounded by art from straight white men and the hoops she had to go through to relate to it. She also writes about the men she holds onto, and her dread that they might one day be revealed as monsters.

16 pages, quarter-size.

In How Are You?, Moe Bowstern reviews cancer. What comes out of these "reviews" is a tale of being changed—feeling different on a fundamental level and not being able to explain it to anyone. The zine is real, sad, hilarious, and wise as all hell. 

"One of the more exciting experiences we can have as human beings is almost dying," Moe writes. "Brushes with death don't need to be all that close to have a tremendous impact on our psyches, reminding us the close line we walk between the worlds at all times. A cancer diagnosis that comes somewhat out of the blue from a routine mammogram—perhaps the very first mammogram that one has in one's life—is a brush with death with no actual basis in a reality of death."

28 pages, half-letter size. Free to people experiencing cancer; contact us if you'd like one. 

The first issue of Listen Up! is a fantastic introduction to podcasts for the uninitiated, a guide for those looking to expand their horizons, and a personal story of interacting and connecting with the form over the course of many years. From Portland's own Katie Ash (Aubade zine).

Fun cut-and-paste layout. 24 pages, half-letter size. Block-printed covers.

The second issue of Katie Ash's podcast review and recommendation zine, Listen Up!, is a treat. As always, Katie's passion for these shows leaps off the page and her cut-and-paste layout makes it a joy to read. This issue focuses largely on POC-led podcasts and includes a lot of shows that don't often make recommendation lists. Without a doubt, you'll finish reading and want to put one of these shows on.

24 pages, half-letter size. Block-printed covers.

A split zine with one side being dedicated to anecdotal stories of loving Lou Reed (R.I.P.!) in the '70s and the other being about falling in love with the Violent Femmes in 1990. Also within: concert reviews, a giant Violent Femmes crossword, and Favorite Movies About Punx comics.

28 pages, half-letter size.

Leave it to PonyBoy Press to write a concise history of everything you ever wanted to know about I Love Lucy. Early TV history, the many ways the show was ahead of its time, and all the dirt behind the first hugely successful American sitcom.

Profiles on Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, William Frawley, and (of course) Lucille Ball. Plus the best episodes, eras of the show, the bad parts, song lyrics, recommended viewing, and a reading list.

32 pages, half-letter size.

An endlessly fun and fascinating zine that reviews celebrity biographies. From Rick James to Three Dog Night, Jayne County to Stevie Nicks, Krazy Kat's George Herriman to Cyndi Lauper, Little House on the Prairie's Laura Ingalls Wilder to Mötley Crüe.

Highly recommended.

28 pages, half-letter size.

A collaboration between Portland nonprofit Know Your City and writer Martha Grover (Somnambulist zine, The End of My Career), The People's Guide to Portland is an in-depth resource guide for marginalized people and communities, as well as a succinct and clear guide to being a good ally. 

Sections within: Chronically Ill/Disabled, Racial Justice, LGBTQIA+, Reproductive Rights, Gender Inequality, Youth, Folks in Recovery, Parenting/Child-Rearing, Survivors of Violent Crime, Survivors of Domestic & Sexual Violence, Housing: Renting and Houselessness, Mental Health, Environmental Justice, Low Income, Educate/Agitate/Organize, Self Care, Veteran Resources, Wealth & Voter Suppression.

And featuring an all-star list of Portland contributors: Katy Ellis O'Brien, Celeste Chicas, Olivia VanSlyke, Bobby Hayden, Max Key, Lydia Grijalva, Kjerstin Johnson, Jaden-Thiago Fraga, Katie Ash, HopSkotch Sunday, Ruby Story, Jamani Ward-Leis, and Trisha Shozuya.

50 pages, half-letter size.