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Hope Amico

You Have All the Tools You Need. An always-important reminder from letterpress artist Hope Amico.

Part of her Keep Writing letterpressed postcard subscription series.

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The truth. From letterpress artist Hope Amico. 3"x5" on chipboard. Part of her letterpressed postcard subscription series.

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The most adorable thank you card ever made. Small cats on a postcard from letterpress artist Hope Amico.

4"x5". Part of her letterpressed postcard subscription series.

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A ridiculously pretty castle from Hope Amico's Keep Writing letterpress postcard series.

You Can Do Anything But You Can't Do Everything.

Sensibly open to possibility. A letterpressed postcard.

Illustrated by Sophie Weiss. Printed and designed by Hope Amico. Part of the Keep Writing project.

"Do you remember Anita Hill? I was a teenager when she testified that Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her at work. He became a Supreme Court Judge anyway but it was the beginning of anti-harassment policies in the workplace. Anita Hill withstood a lot of criticism and ridicule, most of which had little or nothing to do with her testimony. Here is a reminder that her work and words are important...[ continued ]

​Last copy! Five short stories about leaving and five short stories about returning from Hope Amico (Keep Loving, Keep Fighting). New Orleans after the hurricane, New Hampshire, Boston, Milan.

A reversible eight-page mini zine made from one sheet of thick cardstock paper.

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Warm weather wishes from letterpress artist Hope Amico.

Blank inside, 4.25" x 5.5", comes with a sparkly champagne gold A2 envelope.

"You're Doing a Good Job at Life Right Now." A letterpressed postcard from Hope Amico.

Reflections on life in late '80s/early '90s small town New Hampshire, set against major news events of the time period. From the Challenger explosion to the L.A. Riots to hometown police brutality, Hope covers a lot of ground and does it well.

She reflects on her teenage perception of these events and the discussions she wishes teachers and family would have had around them, but also leaves space to think about what draws people to her home state and tell the story of a spiritual path that started with a minimum wage job bussing tables...[ continued ]