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Zines

An introduction to the personal zine (by way of a big box, full of zines, opened decades ago). A fun little journey that will make you want to write your own story, take your own journey.

16 pages, half-letter size.

When Death Knocks is a personal zine written by Death himself. Or, more specifically, written by a lowly "Transition Officer" working for the agency of Death. A morbid and tender piece of writing from the postmortem zine scene. I can say with some certainty that there's nothing else quite like this.

24 pages, quarter-size, cut-and-paste.

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There are a lot of things I love about this little zine. Its subject, for one (hometowns!). But also its wonderful nostalgia, its sadness, its subtle beauty. I also love that most the authors seem to be in their early to mid-30's and have this tempered idealism. Many are coming home or pining for home, or wanting to find home, or wishing they'd got out and it's so beautiful and tragic, all at once...[ continued ]

A beautiful reprint of the second issue of Where You From, the zine about hometowns. Various authors (including our own Joshua James Amberson) give their thoughts on where they’re from. And it’s wonderful. A fascinating study of place, home, community, identity, and so much more.

Edited by Hope Amico of the great Keep Loving, Keep Fighting zine and the[ continued ]

​Last copy! Five short stories about leaving and five short stories about returning from Hope Amico (Keep Loving, Keep Fighting). New Orleans after the hurricane, New Hampshire, Boston, Milan.

A reversible eight-page mini zine made from one sheet of thick cardstock paper.

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Reflections on life in late '80s/early '90s small town New Hampshire, set against major news events of the time period. From the Challenger explosion to the L.A. Riots to hometown police brutality, Hope covers a lot of ground and does it well.

She reflects on her teenage perception of these events and the discussions she wishes teachers and family would have had around them, but also leaves space to think about what draws people to her home state and tell the story of a spiritual path that started with a minimum wage job bussing tables...[ continued ]

In this, the fifth issue of Hope Amico's long-running Where You From zine series, she examines the idea of moving back home to a place you are not from. A year-long commute between Baton Rogue and New Orleans serves as the jumping point into stories, observation, and endless conversations about home and place. As always, a zine very worth picking up.

Includes an 11" x 17" New Orleans hand-drawn map with photos...[ continued ]

Combining her long-running Keep Writing postcard project, a community art grant, and a zine series about the idea of home, Hope Amico asked people in the summer heat of New Orleans to write about how they define home. 

Where You From #6 delves into the ins-and-outs of this immersive project—letter-pressing five-thousand postcards, going to multiple events a day, and simply trying to make the project make sense...[ continued ]

The new issue of the decade-long-running (!) Women of Color Zine. Written as a special edition for this year's Portland Zine Symposium, this issue is full of great pieces. 

Within: From the perspective of a picture book author and librarian, Cathy Camper writes about place as an aspect of representation in children's publishing. Antoinette writes about the process of shedding the shame around mental health issues...[ continued ]

Another zine classic from Portland's own Moe Bowstern. In the third issue of Xtra Tuf (the zine all about the world of commercial fishing in Alaska) Moe tries out the old ways. Instead of dealing with the drama on the boats, she joins some friends on beach and hauls nets by hand. What follows is an entertaining peek into a world most people don't get to see.

Xtra Tuf #3 is also a zine epic to top all zine epics...[ continued ]