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An interview with Closer, the new project from Real Life Buildings folks. Lots of album reviews. Every Minimum Rock + Roll issue is a tiny good time.

8 pages, oblong quarter-size.

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Every issue of the My Complicated Relationship With Food zine series is impossibly good. These "reviews of some of the things we put in our mouths" are surprising and bizarre and, after years of between-issue waiting, Volume Four is finally here and well worth the wait.

Within: getting drunk off mouthwash, potato appreciation, trying to define what a sandwich actually is, the case against gelato, and so much more...[ continued ]

It Only Gets Worse from Here takes the "handwritten inspirational quote art" genre and makes it bleak, lonely, and hilarious. This tiny zine holds 15 unspirational messages to guide you toward your darkest moments.

This is sure to join the ranks of the most popular publications (How to Talk to Your Cat About Gun Safety, Love is Not Constantly Wondering if You're Making the Biggest Mistake of Your Life, Field Guide to the Aliens of Star Trek the Next Generation) in Zachary Auburn's strange catalog of wholly singular oddities...[ continued ]

A split between long-running lo-fi heavyweight Orange Cake Mix and some of the artists that love him. Seven songs from OCM, fourteen covers from folks like: A Journey Of Giraffes, Hifi Envelope, Capitano Merletti, William Elmore Wiltshire, The Journals Kept, Tremolo Ghosts, Mud Pie Sun, Tapes & Tubes, Nolan Kurtz.

Released on Why the Tapes Play. Limited-edition CD, 20 copies, hand-numbered, comes with liner-note booklet with essays and interviews...[ continued ]

Resilient Bastard is a much-needed zine of writers being very open and honest about depression, suicidal thoughts, and tools for coping. Within: stories, exercises, collages, poems, and chances to breathe.

The intention of this zine, as editor Meg Martin says in the introduction, is "to figure out how other people stay alive and to normalize the fact that people deal with suicidal thoughts and actions every day...[ continued ]

In this, the GIANT fifth issue of Minor Leagues, Simon Moreton's dreamy, time-traveling diary comics blend with long pieces of prose. Within: Finding meaning in place, being in nature, moving through loss, living with ghosts.

66 pages, magazine-size, also comes with a free 12-page mini-zine of drawings and photos.

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A tribute to Sun Ra by Portland electronic artist and percussionist J Morales, also known as ABSV. Eight pulsing tracks of experimental Afro-house, interweaving live and electronic percussion, synths, bass, and piano into an instant basement dance party.

Limited edition of 50 hand-numbered copies. On goldenrod yellow with Taino sun images (in honor of the artist's Puerto Rican roots), custom UV-printed at ColorHaus PrintCo in Portland, Oregon...[ continued ]

The latest album of forward-thinking electronics from Phoxii. Life Eating Death Feeding's broken and reconstructed tracks—tracks that blend techno, breakcore, IDM, and chiptune in previously unknown ways—further asserts Phoxii as living in a musical universe that's entirely her own.

Cassette contains material not available digitally. Plus: Hidden in one of these 100 tapes is a Golden Ticket...[ continued ]

A thoughtful zine that asks artists to reexamine how they use Facebook and how Facebook uses them. Not a call to boycott the platform entirely, but to simply think deeply about it and seek solutions beyond it. Written by Paul DeGeorge of Harry & The Potters.

As he so wisely writes in the introduction, Keep Content Off Facebook hopes to give "creative communities a starting point for more closely examining their relationship with Facebook...[ continued ]

Tin Can Telephone, Frederick Moe's great variety zine, is always a treat. In this issue: a short history of pirate TV intrusions, Billy Roberts (Last Night at the Casino) interviews Sarah MacDonald of Thrifty Times zine, Arnold Hollander gives a history of Grassroots Reflections, Frederick talks tape-music history with Ray Carmen, and much more.

28 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]