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The latest (and most gorgeous yet) from Portland literary zine, Windowcat. Playful, daring, varied, and so so good.

With work from: Amie Zimmerman, Dan Raphael, Emily Garcia, Andew Haley, Tracy Pitts, Ditta Baron Hoeber, Mary Hashimoto, Bart King, Ross Robbins, Aimee Lopez, Joshua James Amberson, Jake Ayres, and Jessica Moore.

40 pages, half-letter size, hand-sewn binding, letter-pressed covers...[ continued ]

The Kytchyn Witche is a guide to using simple, natural ingredients for your body and home. It's a straightforward zine that helps you look at household products differently and gives simple recipes for making your own household cleaners and body care creations.

Balms, essential oil steams, infusions, growing/harvesting/preserving herbs, and much more.

24 pages, half-letter size, sewn binding...[ continued ]

Vignettes about the sun that span an impressive range. Nonfiction, fiction, myth, and things in between. How freckles age, a sellout friends' band, the sun's true size, the time it takes for the sun's light to reach earth, and so much more.

With words from: A.J. Michel (Syndicate Product), Amanda Brennan, Arthur Bruso, David Costill, Elly Blue, Jackie Yaeger, Jarod Roselló, Joe Biel, Jonah Matranga, Joseph Carlough, Justin Davis, Katie Haegele...[ continued ]

Slip of the Tongue is writer Katie Haegele's personal dive into everyday linguistics. Essays that go unexpected places and extend from the poetry of sewing to a feminist journey through hair metal.

It's in many ways about the perpetual challenge of figuring out how to put our thoughts, feelings, and experiences into words. "For brief moments I'm able to capture the wonder and pain of my puny experience," Haegele writes, "using only words—the same words I use to scold my cat or tell my sister what time the movie starts—and then, just as quickly, it gets away from me again...[ continued ]

An adorable little zine about a some great cats of history. Cats immortalized in poems, cats who braved trans-Antarctic explorations, cats famous for watching cricket. A perfect gift for any literary cat lover.

16 pages, cut quarter-size. Cover colors vary.

In our effort to stock ever in-print zine Rachel Lee-Carman has ever made, we bring you a classic from her catalog: Offerings of Grace & Mischief #13. Her sketchbook-style personal zines are glorious, emotional roller-coasters through life being fully lived on earth and this one is no exception. Art studios, nettles, crows, good friends, the year of the horse, folk bands, a survey of winter vegetation, and so much more...[ continued ]

The second issue of this high-energy, full-color cut-and-paste tattoo fanzine. With a fresh take on the '90s punk zine aesthetic, Tattoo Punk is something completely its own. Interviews with tattoo artists and afficionados, lot of photos and illustrations. The latest project from Ben Trogdon, editor of the legendary Nuts! fanzine. 

Contributions from Lauren O’Connor, Dracula Orengo, Joe B, Evan Radigan, Virginia Zwanzger, Mateo Cartagena, Nico Zanetti, Cecilia Caldiera, Anahit Gulian, Eugene Terry, Robin Pak, Leann Marie, Pancho, and Somer Stampley...[ continued ]

Two sides of textural ambient synthscapes from some masters of minimalism. Sabriel's Orb is the latest project from Willow Skye-Biggs (Stag Hare, ariel) and John Atkinson is a film composer, formerly of the Brooklyn hypnogogic-pop group Aa.

Released on Whited Sepulchre Records. Listen to Sabriel Orb's side here and John Atkinson's side[ continued ]

Everyday Mythologies is a sideways glance at the mundane myths that make up our lives. Or: three personal essays about collecting, cars, and dads (that are also about gender, masculinity, and strength). 

66 pages, tall pocket-size, letter-pressed covers. Published by Two Plum Press. ISBN #9781732159129.

[ continued ]

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. She asks us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes...[ continued ]